2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159780
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gene Expression after Exposure to a Painful Stimulus in Inbred Strains of Mice
Abstract:
Gene Expression after Exposure to a Painful Stimulus in Inbred Strains of Mice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rasmussen, Nat, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-9758
Co-Authors:N.A. Rasmussen, C. Chaperon, P.H. Lane, W. Langer, K. Devish, A. Sachs, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Individual variation in pain sensitivity is evident in practice. This variability may be due to the interaction of temporal and genetic factors. Of particular interest, are genes that are thought to be involved in acute and chronic pain. The role of catechol-O-methyl transferase (Comt) in the variation in pain sensitivity has been debated. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of time of day and genetic or individual variation to the modulation of Comt expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain in response to a painful stimulus. In the study, 8-week old, male, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice (n = 22-23 mice/strain) were used. The mice were maintained on a 12:12 light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Food and water were available ad libitum. The mice were acclimated to their environment for 1 week prior to exposing the mice to a painful stimulus, a hot-plate. After exposure to a hot-plate at six time points per day including 0000, 0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 (n = 3-4 mice/strain/time point), brain tissue was collected for gene expression analysis. Collection of tissue timed for the dark phase (0000, 0400, and 2000) was performed under dim red light. Gene expression analysis was conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Overall, the C57BL/6J mice were more sensitive to pain and expressed more Comt in the SCN when compared to the DBA/2J mice. Time of day differences in Comt expression within and between the two strains also were noted. Understanding the temporal and genetic variation in the response to pain is important as this knowledge may ultimately lead to the development of an assessment and treatment that is most effective and appropriate for each individual.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGene Expression after Exposure to a Painful Stimulus in Inbred Strains of Miceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159780-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gene Expression after Exposure to a Painful Stimulus in Inbred Strains of Mice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rasmussen, Nat, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-9758</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nrasmuss@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.A. Rasmussen, C. Chaperon, P.H. Lane, W. Langer, K. Devish, A. Sachs, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Individual variation in pain sensitivity is evident in practice. This variability may be due to the interaction of temporal and genetic factors. Of particular interest, are genes that are thought to be involved in acute and chronic pain. The role of catechol-O-methyl transferase (Comt) in the variation in pain sensitivity has been debated. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of time of day and genetic or individual variation to the modulation of Comt expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain in response to a painful stimulus. In the study, 8-week old, male, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice (n = 22-23 mice/strain) were used. The mice were maintained on a 12:12 light/dark cycle (lights on at 0600). Food and water were available ad libitum. The mice were acclimated to their environment for 1 week prior to exposing the mice to a painful stimulus, a hot-plate. After exposure to a hot-plate at six time points per day including 0000, 0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 (n = 3-4 mice/strain/time point), brain tissue was collected for gene expression analysis. Collection of tissue timed for the dark phase (0000, 0400, and 2000) was performed under dim red light. Gene expression analysis was conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Overall, the C57BL/6J mice were more sensitive to pain and expressed more Comt in the SCN when compared to the DBA/2J mice. Time of day differences in Comt expression within and between the two strains also were noted. Understanding the temporal and genetic variation in the response to pain is important as this knowledge may ultimately lead to the development of an assessment and treatment that is most effective and appropriate for each individual.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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