2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159783
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feeding Readiness Tool: A Simplified Clinical Decision-Making Guide
Abstract:
Feeding Readiness Tool: A Simplified Clinical Decision-Making Guide
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rubarth, Lori, PhD, RN, NNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:2303 S. 183rd Circle, Omaha, NE, 68130, USA
Contact Telephone:402-502-9801
Co-Authors:C. Wagner, A. Bartholomay, L. Rubarth, , Creighton University, Omaha, NE; T. Coryell, Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Adequate nutrition is one of the main criteria for determining the length of stay for premature infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). There have been many improvements related to the provision of nutrition to premature infants, yet there continues to be a lack of consistency in the methods used to transition infants to complete oral feeds. Currently, there is no universally accepted tool for determining if an infant is ready to be nipple fed. This leads to a trial-and-error approach or physician-ordered approach. These approaches can be challenging for the nurses as well as the parents. There can be immediate consequences of nipple feeding infants who aren't ready, including apnea, bradycardia, hypoxia, fatigue, and agitation. Long-term effects include delayed oral feeding and increased length of stay. This pilot study included a retrospective chart review of 11 infants born between 28 and 32 weeks gestation prior to the implementation of the feeding readiness tool. Data collected included the gestational age at birth, the gestational age at which they began to nipple feed, the gestational age at which they had achieved full nipple feedings, the length of time to reach full nipple feedings, and the gestational age at discharge. The simplified feeding readiness tool was used on five infants in the NICU and the feeding data were compared. The infants' days to full nipple feeds were decreased by 20% with no change in complications when using the simplified feeding readiness tool. This tool allowed the nurses at the bedside to quickly and objectively assess an infant's readiness to feed. Use of the tool led to a quicker transition to oral feedings and an earlier discharge in 28-32 week gestation infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeeding Readiness Tool: A Simplified Clinical Decision-Making Guideen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159783-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feeding Readiness Tool: A Simplified Clinical Decision-Making Guide</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rubarth, Lori, PhD, RN, NNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2303 S. 183rd Circle, Omaha, NE, 68130, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-502-9801</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lorirubarth@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Wagner, A. Bartholomay, L. Rubarth, , Creighton University, Omaha, NE; T. Coryell, Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adequate nutrition is one of the main criteria for determining the length of stay for premature infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). There have been many improvements related to the provision of nutrition to premature infants, yet there continues to be a lack of consistency in the methods used to transition infants to complete oral feeds. Currently, there is no universally accepted tool for determining if an infant is ready to be nipple fed. This leads to a trial-and-error approach or physician-ordered approach. These approaches can be challenging for the nurses as well as the parents. There can be immediate consequences of nipple feeding infants who aren't ready, including apnea, bradycardia, hypoxia, fatigue, and agitation. Long-term effects include delayed oral feeding and increased length of stay. This pilot study included a retrospective chart review of 11 infants born between 28 and 32 weeks gestation prior to the implementation of the feeding readiness tool. Data collected included the gestational age at birth, the gestational age at which they began to nipple feed, the gestational age at which they had achieved full nipple feedings, the length of time to reach full nipple feedings, and the gestational age at discharge. The simplified feeding readiness tool was used on five infants in the NICU and the feeding data were compared. The infants' days to full nipple feeds were decreased by 20% with no change in complications when using the simplified feeding readiness tool. This tool allowed the nurses at the bedside to quickly and objectively assess an infant's readiness to feed. Use of the tool led to a quicker transition to oral feedings and an earlier discharge in 28-32 week gestation infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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