Effects of a Tailored Interactive Computerized Intervention to Increase Self-Management Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159784
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Tailored Interactive Computerized Intervention to Increase Self-Management Behaviors
Abstract:
Effects of a Tailored Interactive Computerized Intervention to Increase Self-Management Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ryan, Polly, PhD,RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Contact Address:7722 Geralayne Drive, Wauwatosa, WI, 53213, USA
Contact Telephone:414 258 6237
Co-Authors:P. Ryan, D. Maierle, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI;
Aim was to describe differences in knowledge, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, goal congruence, and calcium intake between participants using a tailored interactive computerized intervention (TICI) or printed information (PI). The Integrated Theory of Health Behavior, a self-management theory, was foundational to development of the intervention and research method. Method: In this repeated measures experimental design 145 women were randomly assigned to TICI or PI. Data were obtained at baseline, 8 and 14-weeks, and 6-months. Healthy women between 40 and 60 were recruited. Eligible women had inadequate daily calcium intake, history negative for osteoporosis, and no report of bone-remodeling drug use. PI is a commonly used health booklet with general information about osteoporosis, risk factors, and recommended health behaviors. TICI contains general and tailored information delivered electronically. Web site was matched to theory constructs, and designed to enhance knowledge and facilitate health beliefs. A hand held computer was designed to enhance self-management skills and used 3-times per week for 8-weeks. Participants received packets of data collection forms at enrollment and telephone or email reminders to complete data 3-times over 6-months. Results: There were no significant differences between the TICI and PI groups with respect to age, education, or marital status. The TICI group had more African American participants (X2 = 10.88, p = 0.04). Instruments had high estimates of internal reliability (Chronbach's Alpha coefficient: Self-efficacy = 0.93; Outcome Expectancy = 0.97, and Goal Congruence = 0.94). Knowledge increased for women in both groups with no interaction between time and group (F=0213, p=.647, 1 df). There was a significant time by group interaction for self-efficacy (F=7.07, P=0.009, 1 df) and goal congruence (f=5.59, p=0.021, 1 df). There was no difference in outcome expectancy. Conclusion: In only 8-weeks changes in self-efficacy were observed. Increases in self-efficacy, as occurred with TICI, have potential for mediating long-term change. Significance: New and alternative theories and delivery methods are needed to further enhance health behavior change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Tailored Interactive Computerized Intervention to Increase Self-Management Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159784-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a Tailored Interactive Computerized Intervention to Increase Self-Management Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan, Polly, PhD,RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7722 Geralayne Drive, Wauwatosa, WI, 53213, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414 258 6237</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ryanpa@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Ryan, D. Maierle, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim was to describe differences in knowledge, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, goal congruence, and calcium intake between participants using a tailored interactive computerized intervention (TICI) or printed information (PI). The Integrated Theory of Health Behavior, a self-management theory, was foundational to development of the intervention and research method. Method: In this repeated measures experimental design 145 women were randomly assigned to TICI or PI. Data were obtained at baseline, 8 and 14-weeks, and 6-months. Healthy women between 40 and 60 were recruited. Eligible women had inadequate daily calcium intake, history negative for osteoporosis, and no report of bone-remodeling drug use. PI is a commonly used health booklet with general information about osteoporosis, risk factors, and recommended health behaviors. TICI contains general and tailored information delivered electronically. Web site was matched to theory constructs, and designed to enhance knowledge and facilitate health beliefs. A hand held computer was designed to enhance self-management skills and used 3-times per week for 8-weeks. Participants received packets of data collection forms at enrollment and telephone or email reminders to complete data 3-times over 6-months. Results: There were no significant differences between the TICI and PI groups with respect to age, education, or marital status. The TICI group had more African American participants (X2 = 10.88, p = 0.04). Instruments had high estimates of internal reliability (Chronbach's Alpha coefficient: Self-efficacy = 0.93; Outcome Expectancy = 0.97, and Goal Congruence = 0.94). Knowledge increased for women in both groups with no interaction between time and group (F=0213, p=.647, 1 df). There was a significant time by group interaction for self-efficacy (F=7.07, P=0.009, 1 df) and goal congruence (f=5.59, p=0.021, 1 df). There was no difference in outcome expectancy. Conclusion: In only 8-weeks changes in self-efficacy were observed. Increases in self-efficacy, as occurred with TICI, have potential for mediating long-term change. Significance: New and alternative theories and delivery methods are needed to further enhance health behavior change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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