Taking the Message Home: Patients' Perception of Monitoring During Cardiac Rehabiltiaiton

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Taking the Message Home: Patients' Perception of Monitoring During Cardiac Rehabiltiaiton
Abstract:
Taking the Message Home: Patients' Perception of Monitoring During Cardiac Rehabiltiaiton
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Scotto, Carrie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA
Contact Telephone:330-414-6746
Co-Authors:C.J. Scotto, College of Nursing, The University of Akron, Akron, OH; C.J. Scotto, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Summa Health System, Akron, OH;
Background: Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) include self-monitoring skills such as target heart rate (THR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). These skills are presumably incorporated in the overall goal of achieving self-management at home. Rates of adherence to these skills have not been reported. Follow-up calls as part of a larger IRB approved study at a Midwest CRP indicated graduates were not using THR and RPE. Therefore, follow-up calling format was expanded in order to identify the participants' perception of THR and RPE and their reasons for not using the techniques. Methods. 18 participants: 8 men, 10 women, mean age 73. Eight weeks after completing a CRP, participants were asked if they used THR and RPE as self-monitoring techniques. Prompts such as "Tell me how THR is used." helped participants explain their perception of the techniques. Results: None of the participants reported using THR or RPE. They defined THR as the act of counting their pulse rather than as self-monitoring activity. Some patients (6) were able to explain the meaning of changes in HR as reflecting response to exercise. Most (16) recalled evaluating their effort. Neither skill was identified as a means of self-monitoring, but was experienced as something that was done within the context of the CRP so staff could monitor for problems and complete the medical record. Conclusion: THR and RPE are standard in CRPs, but it is likely that participants are missing the message that they are an important part of self-monitoring and self-management after the program. The regular use of such measures could help people to engage in exercise more fully. In teaching these techniques, CRP staff should take steps to ensure participants understand the use of them as ongoing self-monitoring devices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTaking the Message Home: Patients' Perception of Monitoring During Cardiac Rehabiltiaitonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Taking the Message Home: Patients' Perception of Monitoring During Cardiac Rehabiltiaiton</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scotto, Carrie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-414-6746</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscotto@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.J. Scotto, College of Nursing, The University of Akron, Akron, OH; C.J. Scotto, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Summa Health System, Akron, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) include self-monitoring skills such as target heart rate (THR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). These skills are presumably incorporated in the overall goal of achieving self-management at home. Rates of adherence to these skills have not been reported. Follow-up calls as part of a larger IRB approved study at a Midwest CRP indicated graduates were not using THR and RPE. Therefore, follow-up calling format was expanded in order to identify the participants' perception of THR and RPE and their reasons for not using the techniques. Methods. 18 participants: 8 men, 10 women, mean age 73. Eight weeks after completing a CRP, participants were asked if they used THR and RPE as self-monitoring techniques. Prompts such as &quot;Tell me how THR is used.&quot; helped participants explain their perception of the techniques. Results: None of the participants reported using THR or RPE. They defined THR as the act of counting their pulse rather than as self-monitoring activity. Some patients (6) were able to explain the meaning of changes in HR as reflecting response to exercise. Most (16) recalled evaluating their effort. Neither skill was identified as a means of self-monitoring, but was experienced as something that was done within the context of the CRP so staff could monitor for problems and complete the medical record. Conclusion: THR and RPE are standard in CRPs, but it is likely that participants are missing the message that they are an important part of self-monitoring and self-management after the program. The regular use of such measures could help people to engage in exercise more fully. In teaching these techniques, CRP staff should take steps to ensure participants understand the use of them as ongoing self-monitoring devices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:19:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:19:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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