High-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Education: Design Characteristics and Their Effect on Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159787
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Education: Design Characteristics and Their Effect on Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence
Abstract:
High-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Education: Design Characteristics and Their Effect on Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Smith, Sherrill, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:412 Brett Drive, Dayton, OH, 45433, USA
Contact Telephone:937-318-8422
Co-Authors:S.J. Smith, Nursing , Wright State University, Dayton, OH;
The use of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) is increasing in nursing education despite limited research to support this teaching strategy. A descriptive, correlational design was used to examine the effect of an HFS experience on nursing student satisfaction and self-confidence as well as determine if any design or demographic factors correlated with these two outcomes. A convenience sample of 68 junior nursing students enrolled in a beginning medical/surgical nursing course was used for this study. Students participated in an HFS experience involving care of a patient with a respiratory disorder as either a student nurse or observer. A debriefing followed the experience. All participants completed a researcher-developed demographic questionnaire as well as two National League for Nursing instruments-the Simulation Design Scale and the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale. Results from these five-point Likert scales indicated that students were generally satisfied with the experience and that they felt it positively affected their self-confidence. In addition, the students rated the presence of five design characteristics favorably. It was also found that satisfaction and self-confidence did not depend on the student's role in the experience or having prior experience with a similar patient. Based on correlational analyses, moderately strong relationships existed between all five design characteristics and outcomes of satisfaction and self-confidence. No significant correlations were found between any demographic characteristics and these outcomes. A multiple linear regression analysis, however, noted that together these characteristics accounted for almost half the variance in satisfaction and self-confidence. The results of this study suggest the importance of considering design characteristics when developing HFS simulation for nursing students. The results also suggest that student role in an HFS experience does not affect satisfaction or self-confidence. With increasing use of this teaching strategy, these findings can assist nursing faculty in effective use of this technology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Education: Design Characteristics and Their Effect on Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159787-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">High-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Education: Design Characteristics and Their Effect on Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Sherrill, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">412 Brett Drive, Dayton, OH, 45433, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937-318-8422</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherrill.smith@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.J. Smith, Nursing , Wright State University, Dayton, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The use of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) is increasing in nursing education despite limited research to support this teaching strategy. A descriptive, correlational design was used to examine the effect of an HFS experience on nursing student satisfaction and self-confidence as well as determine if any design or demographic factors correlated with these two outcomes. A convenience sample of 68 junior nursing students enrolled in a beginning medical/surgical nursing course was used for this study. Students participated in an HFS experience involving care of a patient with a respiratory disorder as either a student nurse or observer. A debriefing followed the experience. All participants completed a researcher-developed demographic questionnaire as well as two National League for Nursing instruments-the Simulation Design Scale and the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale. Results from these five-point Likert scales indicated that students were generally satisfied with the experience and that they felt it positively affected their self-confidence. In addition, the students rated the presence of five design characteristics favorably. It was also found that satisfaction and self-confidence did not depend on the student's role in the experience or having prior experience with a similar patient. Based on correlational analyses, moderately strong relationships existed between all five design characteristics and outcomes of satisfaction and self-confidence. No significant correlations were found between any demographic characteristics and these outcomes. A multiple linear regression analysis, however, noted that together these characteristics accounted for almost half the variance in satisfaction and self-confidence. The results of this study suggest the importance of considering design characteristics when developing HFS simulation for nursing students. The results also suggest that student role in an HFS experience does not affect satisfaction or self-confidence. With increasing use of this teaching strategy, these findings can assist nursing faculty in effective use of this technology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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