The Impact of Different Role Assignments in a Human Simulation Scenario on Learning Outcomes among Nursing Students in an Undergraduate Legal and Ethical Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159788
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Different Role Assignments in a Human Simulation Scenario on Learning Outcomes among Nursing Students in an Undergraduate Legal and Ethical Course
Abstract:
The Impact of Different Role Assignments in a Human Simulation Scenario on Learning Outcomes among Nursing Students in an Undergraduate Legal and Ethical Course
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Smith, Katharine, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UMKC
Contact Address:2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816-235-1714
Co-Authors:K.V. Smith, J. Klaassen, C. Zimmerman, A. Cheng, Nursing, UMKC, Kansas City, MO;
Simulation is becoming increasingly recognized as a safe and effective method by which to teach critical thinking skills to student nurses. Preliminary research conducted by the investigators suggested that simulated scenarios more effectively engaged students in learning legal and ethical issues than traditional in-person/online case studies. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of the student's assigned role in the simulated scenario on the student's knowledge about legal and ethical concepts in nursing. The research question was: Is there a difference in student knowledge and attitudes about legal and ethical issues when students play the nurse's role in a simulated scenario versus playing the family member role? Junior level nursing students (n=73) enrolled in a fall semester legal and ethical issues course are participating in the study. Groups of four nursing students will complete the simulation experience at a time, with two students randomly assigned to play nurses in the scenario and two students randomly assigned to play family members. When data collection concludes in December 2008, differences on (a) test scores (b) peer evaluations, (c) faculty evaluations, and (d) student attitudes will be analyzed between the nurse group and the family member group. Also, student feedback on the simulation experience will be examined using content analysis. Results of this study will be used to inform subsequent teaching strategies regarding legal and ethical content in the undergraduate nursing curriculum.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Different Role Assignments in a Human Simulation Scenario on Learning Outcomes among Nursing Students in an Undergraduate Legal and Ethical Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159788-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Different Role Assignments in a Human Simulation Scenario on Learning Outcomes among Nursing Students in an Undergraduate Legal and Ethical Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Katharine, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UMKC</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816-235-1714</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smithkv@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.V. Smith, J. Klaassen, C. Zimmerman, A. Cheng, Nursing, UMKC, Kansas City, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Simulation is becoming increasingly recognized as a safe and effective method by which to teach critical thinking skills to student nurses. Preliminary research conducted by the investigators suggested that simulated scenarios more effectively engaged students in learning legal and ethical issues than traditional in-person/online case studies. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of the student's assigned role in the simulated scenario on the student's knowledge about legal and ethical concepts in nursing. The research question was: Is there a difference in student knowledge and attitudes about legal and ethical issues when students play the nurse's role in a simulated scenario versus playing the family member role? Junior level nursing students (n=73) enrolled in a fall semester legal and ethical issues course are participating in the study. Groups of four nursing students will complete the simulation experience at a time, with two students randomly assigned to play nurses in the scenario and two students randomly assigned to play family members. When data collection concludes in December 2008, differences on (a) test scores (b) peer evaluations, (c) faculty evaluations, and (d) student attitudes will be analyzed between the nurse group and the family member group. Also, student feedback on the simulation experience will be examined using content analysis. Results of this study will be used to inform subsequent teaching strategies regarding legal and ethical content in the undergraduate nursing curriculum.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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