2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159793
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Families of Children Who are Technology Dependent
Abstract:
Families of Children Who are Technology Dependent
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Toly, Valerie, PhD(c), RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:2579 Biscayne Blvd., Beachwood, OH, 44122, USA
Contact Telephone:(216) 368-3082
Co-Authors:V.A. Toly, C.M. Musil, D. Dowling, S. Tullai-McGuinness, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; J.C. Carl, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Few studies have examined the effects that children who are technology-dependent and living at home have upon the functioning of their families. Therefore, this study examined: (a) the relationship between child/maternal factors and family functioning for technology-dependent children and their families; (b) whether there are differences in outcomes (family functioning, normalization, depressive symptoms) based upon the child's level of technology (mechanical ventilation, intravenous nutrition/medication, respiratory/nutritional support). Knafl and Deatrick's Family Management Style Framework and Paterson's "Shifting Perspectives Model of Chronic Illness" guided the study. Study questions include: (1) What are the relationships between child and maternal factors and family functioning? (2) Are there differences in outcomes based upon the child's level of technology? A descriptive, correlational design was used in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using standardized instruments in face-to-face interviews. Mothers of 103 children who are technology-dependent and living at home comprised the sample. Data analysis included correlations, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and hierarchical multiple regression. The sample of mothers aged 21-66 years were 74% Caucasian and 26% women of color, who cared for their technology-dependent child aged 6 months-16 years. Approximately 42% of study children were 5 years and younger; 73% received solely respiratory/nutritional support. Pearson correlations revealed that greater depressive symptoms and less use of normalization were significantly associated with poorer family functioning. In the hierarchical regression, 32% of the variance in family functioning was explained, primarily by level of depressive symptoms. ANOVA analysis showed no statistically significant difference in outcomes based upon the child's level of technology-dependence. Mothers of children who are technology-dependent are at high risk for psychological distress that can affect overall family functioning. This work will be pivotal in designing interventions to assist families in the home management of this vulnerable population of children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamilies of Children Who are Technology Dependenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159793-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Families of Children Who are Technology Dependent</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Toly, Valerie, PhD(c), RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2579 Biscayne Blvd., Beachwood, OH, 44122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(216) 368-3082</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vab@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V.A. Toly, C.M. Musil, D. Dowling, S. Tullai-McGuinness, School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; J.C. Carl, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Few studies have examined the effects that children who are technology-dependent and living at home have upon the functioning of their families. Therefore, this study examined: (a) the relationship between child/maternal factors and family functioning for technology-dependent children and their families; (b) whether there are differences in outcomes (family functioning, normalization, depressive symptoms) based upon the child's level of technology (mechanical ventilation, intravenous nutrition/medication, respiratory/nutritional support). Knafl and Deatrick's Family Management Style Framework and Paterson's &quot;Shifting Perspectives Model of Chronic Illness&quot; guided the study. Study questions include: (1) What are the relationships between child and maternal factors and family functioning? (2) Are there differences in outcomes based upon the child's level of technology? A descriptive, correlational design was used in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using standardized instruments in face-to-face interviews. Mothers of 103 children who are technology-dependent and living at home comprised the sample. Data analysis included correlations, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and hierarchical multiple regression. The sample of mothers aged 21-66 years were 74% Caucasian and 26% women of color, who cared for their technology-dependent child aged 6 months-16 years. Approximately 42% of study children were 5 years and younger; 73% received solely respiratory/nutritional support. Pearson correlations revealed that greater depressive symptoms and less use of normalization were significantly associated with poorer family functioning. In the hierarchical regression, 32% of the variance in family functioning was explained, primarily by level of depressive symptoms. ANOVA analysis showed no statistically significant difference in outcomes based upon the child's level of technology-dependence. Mothers of children who are technology-dependent are at high risk for psychological distress that can affect overall family functioning. This work will be pivotal in designing interventions to assist families in the home management of this vulnerable population of children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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