The Effect of Prehabiliation on Functional Ability and Pain Prior to and Following TKA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Prehabiliation on Functional Ability and Pain Prior to and Following TKA
Abstract:
The Effect of Prehabiliation on Functional Ability and Pain Prior to and Following TKA
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Topp, Robert, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Louisville
Contact Address:555 S. Floyd St, 3rd Floor K Building, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:502-593-1865
Co-Authors:R. Topp, School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; A.M. Swank, Exercise Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; P.M. Quesada, Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; J. Nyland, A. Malkani, Schoo
"Prehabilitation" is preparing for the stress of orthopedic surgery by exercise training, and improves functional ability and reduces pain prior to surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare functional ability and pain prior to and following knee replacement surgery (TKA) among patients who did and did not participate in prehabilitation. A total of 54 subjects who were scheduled for TKA were randomized into either an intervention or control. Subjects in the control engaged in the usual care prior to their TKA. Subjects in the intervention were instructed to engage in prehabilitation exercises at least 3 times per week until their TKA. The prehabilitation intervention emphasized resistance training, flexibility, and step training. Functional ability including sit-to-stand repetitions in 30 seconds, distance walked in 6-minutes and time to ascend and descend a flight of 11 stairs were collected following consent (T1) just prior to TKA (T2), one (T3) and three (T4) months following TKA. Pain during these functional tasks was also assessed using a VAS. All subjects engaged in a standardized rehabilitation program following their TKA. Repeated measures ANOVA determined no differences between the study groups at any data collection point. Differences within the groups indicated that only the intervention, not the control, significantly decreased their body weight (M = -7.5 lbs) improved their functional ability including sit-to-stand (M= plus 2.5 repetitions), and ascending (M = -2.4 sec.) and descending (M = -3.2 sec) stairs over the duration of the study. Both groups improved in the 6-minute walk between T1 to T4. The control group exhibited significantly more pain during the sit-to-stand and ascending stairs between T1 and T2. Both groups exhibited significant declines in pain following their TKA. Individuals scheduled for TKA who complete prehabilitation improve their post-operative functioning while patients who receive usual care do not improve their functioning following their TKA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Prehabiliation on Functional Ability and Pain Prior to and Following TKAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Prehabiliation on Functional Ability and Pain Prior to and Following TKA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Topp, Robert, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">555 S. Floyd St, 3rd Floor K Building, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502-593-1865</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rvtopp01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Topp, School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; A.M. Swank, Exercise Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; P.M. Quesada, Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; J. Nyland, A. Malkani, Schoo</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">&quot;Prehabilitation&quot; is preparing for the stress of orthopedic surgery by exercise training, and improves functional ability and reduces pain prior to surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare functional ability and pain prior to and following knee replacement surgery (TKA) among patients who did and did not participate in prehabilitation. A total of 54 subjects who were scheduled for TKA were randomized into either an intervention or control. Subjects in the control engaged in the usual care prior to their TKA. Subjects in the intervention were instructed to engage in prehabilitation exercises at least 3 times per week until their TKA. The prehabilitation intervention emphasized resistance training, flexibility, and step training. Functional ability including sit-to-stand repetitions in 30 seconds, distance walked in 6-minutes and time to ascend and descend a flight of 11 stairs were collected following consent (T1) just prior to TKA (T2), one (T3) and three (T4) months following TKA. Pain during these functional tasks was also assessed using a VAS. All subjects engaged in a standardized rehabilitation program following their TKA. Repeated measures ANOVA determined no differences between the study groups at any data collection point. Differences within the groups indicated that only the intervention, not the control, significantly decreased their body weight (M = -7.5 lbs) improved their functional ability including sit-to-stand (M= plus 2.5 repetitions), and ascending (M = -2.4 sec.) and descending (M = -3.2 sec) stairs over the duration of the study. Both groups improved in the 6-minute walk between T1 to T4. The control group exhibited significantly more pain during the sit-to-stand and ascending stairs between T1 and T2. Both groups exhibited significant declines in pain following their TKA. Individuals scheduled for TKA who complete prehabilitation improve their post-operative functioning while patients who receive usual care do not improve their functioning following their TKA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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