2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159797
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Attitudes Toward Public Breastfeeding
Abstract:
Community Attitudes Toward Public Breastfeeding
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Vari, Patty, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Jefferson College of Health Sciences
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:920 S. Jefferson Street, P.O. Box 13186, Roanoke, VA, 24031-3186, USA
Contact Telephone:540-985-8532
Co-Authors:P.M. Vari, Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA; H. Peterson, Nursing, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND; N. Vogeltanz-Holm, Center for Health Promotion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; C.M. Anderson, Nursing, Uni
Breastmilk is designed by nature to meet the specific needs of the human species and provides all that is necessary for normal infant growth, development, and health for the first six months of life. Efforts to increase breastfeeding rates have identified barriers to women choosing to breastfeed. Community reactions to public breastfeeding are one identified barrier. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the prevalence, patterns, and correlates among various breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs, bottle feeding attitudes and beliefs, experiences with breastfeeding, and feelings about viewing breastfeeding in various settings in both a student and adult (faculty, staff, and administrators) community sample from a Midwestern university. The Theory of Planned Behavior was used as the theoretical model. A convenience sample of 761 participants responded to an online questionnaire using the Infant Feeding Questionnaire. This instrument queried participants about their breastfeeding/bottle feeding attitudes and beliefs, breastfeeding experiences, feelings about viewing breastfeeding in various settings, and biographic information. Students were 63% of the total participants; 34% were faculty, staff, and administrators (FSA). Seventy percent of students and 75% of the FSA were women. The respondents in this study had a higher rate of breastfeeding than the general population and had high scores on the Breastfeeding Attitude and Breastfeeding Beliefs scales, yet a noteworthy number of them felt that public settings were an inappropriate place for breastfeeding to occur. One third to one half of the Student group marked school (33.7%), church (29.9%), mall (37%), and restaurant (45.1%) as inappropriate settings for breastfeeding. Restaurant was the only public place where more than a fourth of the FSA group (26.3%) marked as inappropriate. The disjuncture among those that are supportive of breastfeeding and still feel public breastfeeding is inappropriate will continue to affect community breastfeeding behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Attitudes Toward Public Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159797-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Attitudes Toward Public Breastfeeding</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vari, Patty, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Jefferson College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">920 S. Jefferson Street, P.O. Box 13186, Roanoke, VA, 24031-3186, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">540-985-8532</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmvari@jchs.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.M. Vari, Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA; H. Peterson, Nursing, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND; N. Vogeltanz-Holm, Center for Health Promotion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; C.M. Anderson, Nursing, Uni</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Breastmilk is designed by nature to meet the specific needs of the human species and provides all that is necessary for normal infant growth, development, and health for the first six months of life. Efforts to increase breastfeeding rates have identified barriers to women choosing to breastfeed. Community reactions to public breastfeeding are one identified barrier. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the prevalence, patterns, and correlates among various breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs, bottle feeding attitudes and beliefs, experiences with breastfeeding, and feelings about viewing breastfeeding in various settings in both a student and adult (faculty, staff, and administrators) community sample from a Midwestern university. The Theory of Planned Behavior was used as the theoretical model. A convenience sample of 761 participants responded to an online questionnaire using the Infant Feeding Questionnaire. This instrument queried participants about their breastfeeding/bottle feeding attitudes and beliefs, breastfeeding experiences, feelings about viewing breastfeeding in various settings, and biographic information. Students were 63% of the total participants; 34% were faculty, staff, and administrators (FSA). Seventy percent of students and 75% of the FSA were women. The respondents in this study had a higher rate of breastfeeding than the general population and had high scores on the Breastfeeding Attitude and Breastfeeding Beliefs scales, yet a noteworthy number of them felt that public settings were an inappropriate place for breastfeeding to occur. One third to one half of the Student group marked school (33.7%), church (29.9%), mall (37%), and restaurant (45.1%) as inappropriate settings for breastfeeding. Restaurant was the only public place where more than a fourth of the FSA group (26.3%) marked as inappropriate. The disjuncture among those that are supportive of breastfeeding and still feel public breastfeeding is inappropriate will continue to affect community breastfeeding behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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