2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159798
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Nurses' Cognitive Representations of Children's Pain
Abstract:
Pediatric Nurses' Cognitive Representations of Children's Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Vincent, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3213553283
Co-Authors:C. Vincent, Department of Women, Children, and Family Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; D. Wilkie, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago
In spite of advances in pain assessment and pharmacological management, hospitalized children continue to report unrelieved pain. Research has shown that nurses believed that children over-reported their pain and consistently administered less analgesia than available and recommended. Previous pilot data suggested that measuring nurses' cognitive representations may be more sensitive than knowledge and attitude surveys in explaining and predicting nurses' assessment and management behaviors. The specific aims of this study were 1) to determine nurses' cognitive representations of assessing and managing children' pain, and 2) to examine the degree of congruence between nurses' cognitive representations and their choices to assess pain and administer analgesia in case studies. Using Kaplan's Theory of Cognitive Representation and a descriptive exploratory design, we interviewed 87 registered nurses who cared for children at four urban or suburban hospitals. We measured nurses' cognitive representations of children's pain with the Conceptual Content Cognitive Map (3CM), an open-ended technique that permits identification of assumptions and beliefs most likely to influence behavior. Nurses (95% female, mean age 31.9 +/- 8.9, mean years in pediatric nursing 6.9 +/- 7.5) also responded to case studies about assessment and analgesia administration. Analyses revealed that nurses had rich and diverse cognitive representations of children's pain assessment and management. Content items in nurses' maps were coded into assessment and management domains and multiple sub-groups within each domain. For assessment, 91% of nurses identified behavioral manifestations and 79% identified use of self-report. For management, 92% identified pharmacological approaches and 71-83% identified nonpharmacological approaches. Nurses distrusted the validity of children's self-report of pain intensity and had misunderstandings about pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions to relieve pain. With more accurate understandings of nurses' cognitive representations about children's pain, researchers will be able to develop targeted interventions to improve both nurses' practice and children's pain relief.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Nurses' Cognitive Representations of Children's Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159798-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Nurses' Cognitive Representations of Children's Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3213553283</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vincentc@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Vincent, Department of Women, Children, and Family Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; D. Wilkie, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In spite of advances in pain assessment and pharmacological management, hospitalized children continue to report unrelieved pain. Research has shown that nurses believed that children over-reported their pain and consistently administered less analgesia than available and recommended. Previous pilot data suggested that measuring nurses' cognitive representations may be more sensitive than knowledge and attitude surveys in explaining and predicting nurses' assessment and management behaviors. The specific aims of this study were 1) to determine nurses' cognitive representations of assessing and managing children' pain, and 2) to examine the degree of congruence between nurses' cognitive representations and their choices to assess pain and administer analgesia in case studies. Using Kaplan's Theory of Cognitive Representation and a descriptive exploratory design, we interviewed 87 registered nurses who cared for children at four urban or suburban hospitals. We measured nurses' cognitive representations of children's pain with the Conceptual Content Cognitive Map (3CM), an open-ended technique that permits identification of assumptions and beliefs most likely to influence behavior. Nurses (95% female, mean age 31.9 +/- 8.9, mean years in pediatric nursing 6.9 +/- 7.5) also responded to case studies about assessment and analgesia administration. Analyses revealed that nurses had rich and diverse cognitive representations of children's pain assessment and management. Content items in nurses' maps were coded into assessment and management domains and multiple sub-groups within each domain. For assessment, 91% of nurses identified behavioral manifestations and 79% identified use of self-report. For management, 92% identified pharmacological approaches and 71-83% identified nonpharmacological approaches. Nurses distrusted the validity of children's self-report of pain intensity and had misunderstandings about pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions to relieve pain. With more accurate understandings of nurses' cognitive representations about children's pain, researchers will be able to develop targeted interventions to improve both nurses' practice and children's pain relief.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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