Assessing the Evidence: Is Group Prenatal Care Effective for Improving Pregnancy Outcomes?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159799
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing the Evidence: Is Group Prenatal Care Effective for Improving Pregnancy Outcomes?
Abstract:
Assessing the Evidence: Is Group Prenatal Care Effective for Improving Pregnancy Outcomes?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Vonderheid, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7982
Co-Authors:S.C. Vonderheid, K.F. Norr, C. Klima, Women Children and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Background. Innovative models of prenatal care (PNC) are greatly needed to enhance PNC content and effectiveness, and to reduce racial/ethnic disparities. One potential model is Group-PNC. The purpose of this project was to examine the evidence for the effectiveness of Group-PNC to improve pregnancy outcomes with a focus on birth weight (BW) and prematurity. Design. An integrative review of the literature. Methods to evaluate evidence were based on (1) Briss's approach for classifying study designs and determining the suitability of a design to assess effectiveness; and (2) Downs and Black's (1998) assessment of methodological quality. Study ratings by two independent reviewers achieved high reliability (1.00). Sample. Databases were: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Popline, Web of Science, Cochrane, OCLC First Search, Academic Search Premier, and CINAHL. Search terms included: group PNC, group visits, group care, PNC, antenatal care, CenteringPregnancy. Inclusion criteria were (a) evaluation of Group-PNC, (b) written in English, (c), published through July, 2008. References were manually searched. Six out of 15 articles found examined BW and/or prematurity. Analysis. Data abstracted from the studies included: author/year; purpose; sample; design; variables/measures; analysis; findings; implications; strengths; limitations; suitability and methodological quality. Results. Five studies examined BW; two found significantly better outcomes for Group-PNC, two found favorable trends for Group-PNC, and one had few LBW infants but no comparison group. Five studies reported preterm birth rate/gestational age. The only randomized trial and one other study found significantly fewer preterm births for Group-PNC, one study found no difference, one study reported a higher GA but significance was not reported, and one study had a low preterm birth rate but no comparison group. Conclusions. Group-PNC offers an alternative to routine PNC that shows potential for improving pregnancy outcomes and reducing racial/ethnic disparities. Studies are needed to further test, refine, and explore the components of Group-PNC compared to routine individual care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the Evidence: Is Group Prenatal Care Effective for Improving Pregnancy Outcomes?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159799-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing the Evidence: Is Group Prenatal Care Effective for Improving Pregnancy Outcomes?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vonderheid, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7982</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vonde@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.C. Vonderheid, K.F. Norr, C. Klima, Women Children and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. Innovative models of prenatal care (PNC) are greatly needed to enhance PNC content and effectiveness, and to reduce racial/ethnic disparities. One potential model is Group-PNC. The purpose of this project was to examine the evidence for the effectiveness of Group-PNC to improve pregnancy outcomes with a focus on birth weight (BW) and prematurity. Design. An integrative review of the literature. Methods to evaluate evidence were based on (1) Briss's approach for classifying study designs and determining the suitability of a design to assess effectiveness; and (2) Downs and Black's (1998) assessment of methodological quality. Study ratings by two independent reviewers achieved high reliability (1.00). Sample. Databases were: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Popline, Web of Science, Cochrane, OCLC First Search, Academic Search Premier, and CINAHL. Search terms included: group PNC, group visits, group care, PNC, antenatal care, CenteringPregnancy. Inclusion criteria were (a) evaluation of Group-PNC, (b) written in English, (c), published through July, 2008. References were manually searched. Six out of 15 articles found examined BW and/or prematurity. Analysis. Data abstracted from the studies included: author/year; purpose; sample; design; variables/measures; analysis; findings; implications; strengths; limitations; suitability and methodological quality. Results. Five studies examined BW; two found significantly better outcomes for Group-PNC, two found favorable trends for Group-PNC, and one had few LBW infants but no comparison group. Five studies reported preterm birth rate/gestational age. The only randomized trial and one other study found significantly fewer preterm births for Group-PNC, one study found no difference, one study reported a higher GA but significance was not reported, and one study had a low preterm birth rate but no comparison group. Conclusions. Group-PNC offers an alternative to routine PNC that shows potential for improving pregnancy outcomes and reducing racial/ethnic disparities. Studies are needed to further test, refine, and explore the components of Group-PNC compared to routine individual care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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