2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Which Stroke Symptoms Predict Use of 911?
Abstract:
Which Stroke Symptoms Predict Use of 911?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wehner, Susan, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:B 401 Clinical Center, 138 Service Rd, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:5178842495
Co-Authors:S.E. Wehner, Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; M. Reeves, Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;
Background: Stroke is a preventable and treatable disease, but the lack of seeking attention acutely after stroke onset remains a compelling problem (1). Thrombolytic therapy is an effective treatment if given within three hours of onset (2). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports no improvement in awareness of stroke warning symptoms from 2001 to 2005 as evidenced by the respondents who recognized stroke warning signs, 17.2% vs. 16.4% (3). Wilson and Cleary identify symptoms as important determinants of functioning and action (4). Prior research indicates gender, racial, and economic disparities play a role in symptom recognition and interpretation (5). Gaps exist in the specificity and sensitivity of stroke symptoms as defined by the American Heart Association Stroke Warning Signs (6). The purpose of this study is to examine symptom experience in acute stroke and analyze the impact on emergency action. Methods: Data from a statewide stroke database provided information on demographics, risk factors, symptom representation, treatment, and discharge status in 16 Michigan hospitals over a 6- month period. Prior work extracted symptom information from the free-text data to the Stroke Warning Signs (Kappa's >.85). Polytomous logistic models identified the association between symptoms and arrival to Emergency Department time. Factor analysis was done on the symptom clusters to identify paths and common factor loadings. Results: Of 1922 cases, 19% arrived within 2 hours, 22% arrived between 2 and 6 hours. Most common symptom was unilateral weakness/numbness (40%), followed by speech difficulties (22%). Unilateral weakness, speech difficulty, and change in level of consciousness had highest factor loadings with CFA .92 and RMSEA 0.72. Women presented with symptoms inconsistent with stroke 38% of the time resulting in delays in care. Conclusions: Patients describing classic unilateral symptoms and speech were more likely to seek early care, while patients with less common symptoms such as vision loss, ataxia, and headache delay emergency care. Classic symptoms that make up the Stroke Warning Signs do not load on common factors. Nurses are in a unique position to educate patients and the public on all stroke symptoms, both common and uncommon.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhich Stroke Symptoms Predict Use of 911?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159801-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Which Stroke Symptoms Predict Use of 911?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wehner, Susan, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">B 401 Clinical Center, 138 Service Rd, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5178842495</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sue.wehner@ht.msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.E. Wehner, Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; M. Reeves, Epidemiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Stroke is a preventable and treatable disease, but the lack of seeking attention acutely after stroke onset remains a compelling problem (1). Thrombolytic therapy is an effective treatment if given within three hours of onset (2). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports no improvement in awareness of stroke warning symptoms from 2001 to 2005 as evidenced by the respondents who recognized stroke warning signs, 17.2% vs. 16.4% (3). Wilson and Cleary identify symptoms as important determinants of functioning and action (4). Prior research indicates gender, racial, and economic disparities play a role in symptom recognition and interpretation (5). Gaps exist in the specificity and sensitivity of stroke symptoms as defined by the American Heart Association Stroke Warning Signs (6). The purpose of this study is to examine symptom experience in acute stroke and analyze the impact on emergency action. Methods: Data from a statewide stroke database provided information on demographics, risk factors, symptom representation, treatment, and discharge status in 16 Michigan hospitals over a 6- month period. Prior work extracted symptom information from the free-text data to the Stroke Warning Signs (Kappa's &gt;.85). Polytomous logistic models identified the association between symptoms and arrival to Emergency Department time. Factor analysis was done on the symptom clusters to identify paths and common factor loadings. Results: Of 1922 cases, 19% arrived within 2 hours, 22% arrived between 2 and 6 hours. Most common symptom was unilateral weakness/numbness (40%), followed by speech difficulties (22%). Unilateral weakness, speech difficulty, and change in level of consciousness had highest factor loadings with CFA .92 and RMSEA 0.72. Women presented with symptoms inconsistent with stroke 38% of the time resulting in delays in care. Conclusions: Patients describing classic unilateral symptoms and speech were more likely to seek early care, while patients with less common symptoms such as vision loss, ataxia, and headache delay emergency care. Classic symptoms that make up the Stroke Warning Signs do not load on common factors. Nurses are in a unique position to educate patients and the public on all stroke symptoms, both common and uncommon.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:20:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:20:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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