2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159807
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers' interactions with handicapped infants: Adaptive or maladaptive?
Abstract:
Mothers' interactions with handicapped infants: Adaptive or maladaptive?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Becker, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:600 Highland Ave., K6/250, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5194
Maternal interactive behavior may be negatively affected by infant handicap. However, apparent deficits may in fact function to maintain balance in the interactive system. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which difference in maternal behavior rated with scales in current clinical use might be adaptive as opposed to maladaptive. Associations of interactive behavior with the demands of the interaction (structured task vs routine caretaking), child characteristics (chronological age, developmental age âDAÕ, and interactive behavior), and parent characteristics (stress, coping, and maternal education), were examined. Interaction of 30 mothers with handicapped infants (study) and 30 comparison dyads was rated at 8 and 12 months during feeding and teaching sessions; stress and coping were assessed by questionnaire. Study mothers provided less support for affective and cognitive development. However, with correction for DA differences remained only for the structured task, and study mothers were more sensitive and involved if DA was low. Interactive behavior was related most strongly to mother education; relations with stress and coping resources were minimal. Results suggest that apparent differences on standardized assessments need careful interpretation with respect to multiple dimensions of the mother-child system.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers' interactions with handicapped infants: Adaptive or maladaptive?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159807-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mothers' interactions with handicapped infants: Adaptive or maladaptive?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Becker, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Ave., K6/250, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5194</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Maternal interactive behavior may be negatively affected by infant handicap. However, apparent deficits may in fact function to maintain balance in the interactive system. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which difference in maternal behavior rated with scales in current clinical use might be adaptive as opposed to maladaptive. Associations of interactive behavior with the demands of the interaction (structured task vs routine caretaking), child characteristics (chronological age, developmental age &acirc;DA&Otilde;, and interactive behavior), and parent characteristics (stress, coping, and maternal education), were examined. Interaction of 30 mothers with handicapped infants (study) and 30 comparison dyads was rated at 8 and 12 months during feeding and teaching sessions; stress and coping were assessed by questionnaire. Study mothers provided less support for affective and cognitive development. However, with correction for DA differences remained only for the structured task, and study mothers were more sensitive and involved if DA was low. Interactive behavior was related most strongly to mother education; relations with stress and coping resources were minimal. Results suggest that apparent differences on standardized assessments need careful interpretation with respect to multiple dimensions of the mother-child system.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:21:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:21:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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