Nurses' reasoning about uncertainty in determining readiness for ventilator weaning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' reasoning about uncertainty in determining readiness for ventilator weaning
Abstract:
Nurses' reasoning about uncertainty in determining readiness for ventilator weaning
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Narayan, Suzanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Metropolitan State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 700 East Seventh Street, St. Paul, MN, 55106-5000, USA
Contact Telephone:651.772.7709
Grounded In information-processing theory, this study investigated how expert and novice nurses differed in the use of lines of reasoning (LORs) to handle uncertainty In determining weaning readiness in 16, simulated patient cases. LORs were defined as arguments used to reach choices. Uncertainty was defined as a perceived lack of knowledge about the patient or the weaning situation. Subjects were six novice and six expert nurses employed In a Midwestern hospital. Using verbal protocol technique, subjects thought aloud while interpreting patient cues and determining readiness to wean. Transcripts were content analyzed to determine subjects LORs. Study results indicated: a) subjects used LORs to reduce uncertainty by focusing on a small number of cues that triggered concepts and expectations for the meaning of cues, b) experts expressed more accurate and detailed interpretation of cues than novices, and c) novices misinterpreted cues, often leading to Incorrect LORs and erroneous decisions. Gaining insight Into nurses' mechanisms for handling uncertainty should enhance the quality of their decision making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' reasoning about uncertainty in determining readiness for ventilator weaningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' reasoning about uncertainty in determining readiness for ventilator weaning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Narayan, Suzanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Metropolitan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 700 East Seventh Street, St. Paul, MN, 55106-5000, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">651.772.7709</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">suzanne.narayan@metrostate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Grounded In information-processing theory, this study investigated how expert and novice nurses differed in the use of lines of reasoning (LORs) to handle uncertainty In determining weaning readiness in 16, simulated patient cases. LORs were defined as arguments used to reach choices. Uncertainty was defined as a perceived lack of knowledge about the patient or the weaning situation. Subjects were six novice and six expert nurses employed In a Midwestern hospital. Using verbal protocol technique, subjects thought aloud while interpreting patient cues and determining readiness to wean. Transcripts were content analyzed to determine subjects LORs. Study results indicated: a) subjects used LORs to reduce uncertainty by focusing on a small number of cues that triggered concepts and expectations for the meaning of cues, b) experts expressed more accurate and detailed interpretation of cues than novices, and c) novices misinterpreted cues, often leading to Incorrect LORs and erroneous decisions. Gaining insight Into nurses' mechanisms for handling uncertainty should enhance the quality of their decision making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:21:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:21:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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