2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159816
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothers
Abstract:
Nurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Roberts, Ora, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:VNS
Contact Address:2802 Wetmore Suite 300, Everett, WA, 98201, USA
Contact Telephone:4252522400
The purpose of the study was to describe nurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothers. The theory of Nursing for the Whole Person was the framework used to support the study. Criterion measures selected were type of behavior (i.e., spiritual, mental, and physical), and degree of helpfulness. A descriptive, nonexperimental design was used. A convenience, non-random sample of 15 primiparous mothers was chosen from a population of mothers who were breastfeeding at the time of hospital discharge. A 37-item semi-structured interview guide was developed and tested for validity and reliability. The subjects were surveyed in home interviews held approximately 30 days postpartum. A content analysis is being done to organize and categorize data. Additionally, mode and median intensity scores have been calculated for each of 23 helpful nurse behaviors. Prayer, instruction on how to tell if the baby is getting enough milk, and hands-on assistance were reported as being the three most helpful nurse behaviors. However, preliminary findings suggest that mother/baby dyads are highly individual and therefore, nurses assisting new mothers with breastfeeding should be sensitive to individual needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159816-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Ora, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">VNS</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2802 Wetmore Suite 300, Everett, WA, 98201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4252522400</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">allenora@gte.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to describe nurse behaviors helpful for breastfeeding success, as perceived by mothers. The theory of Nursing for the Whole Person was the framework used to support the study. Criterion measures selected were type of behavior (i.e., spiritual, mental, and physical), and degree of helpfulness. A descriptive, nonexperimental design was used. A convenience, non-random sample of 15 primiparous mothers was chosen from a population of mothers who were breastfeeding at the time of hospital discharge. A 37-item semi-structured interview guide was developed and tested for validity and reliability. The subjects were surveyed in home interviews held approximately 30 days postpartum. A content analysis is being done to organize and categorize data. Additionally, mode and median intensity scores have been calculated for each of 23 helpful nurse behaviors. Prayer, instruction on how to tell if the baby is getting enough milk, and hands-on assistance were reported as being the three most helpful nurse behaviors. However, preliminary findings suggest that mother/baby dyads are highly individual and therefore, nurses assisting new mothers with breastfeeding should be sensitive to individual needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:21:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:21:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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