2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospice: Intensive care of the dying
Abstract:
Hospice: Intensive care of the dying
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Wilson, Sarah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Clark Hall 319, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:414.288.3860
The purpose of this exploratory study was to chart the ethnography

of the hospice and assess hospice effectiveness. Research was done

in 3 hospice sites--2 home care and 1 inpatient. Data came from 59

semistructured interviews with dying persons, close kin, and staff

members, and from participant observation. Viewing dying/death as

a status passage, a good passage is one in which all actors

accept the imminence of death, dying person and kin have resolved

socioemotional and material concerns, symptoms and pain are

controlled, and death occurs on time, i.e., it is neither too

abrupt nor unduly prolonged. In a bad death, the converse of one

or more of the foregoing occurs. Results suggest that restrictive

effects of certain Medicare regulations and the hospice's low

visibility in the community tend to limit the effectiveness of

hospice care. Nonetheless, it is argued that the hospice is a

successful and effective innovation, a humane alternative to the

impersonal and routinized management of dying and death in the

usual hospital or nursing home. Nurses emerged as the central

caregivers. Despite the high potential for stress and staff

burnout, there is little turnover among hospice nurses. Coping

mechanisms include emphasis on mutual support, open communication,

varied provision for breaks, respite, and a general

religious/spiritual faith.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospice: Intensive care of the dyingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159818-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospice: Intensive care of the dying</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Sarah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Clark Hall 319, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.288.3860</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sarah.wilson@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this exploratory study was to chart the ethnography<br/><br/>of the hospice and assess hospice effectiveness. Research was done<br/><br/>in 3 hospice sites--2 home care and 1 inpatient. Data came from 59<br/><br/>semistructured interviews with dying persons, close kin, and staff<br/><br/>members, and from participant observation. Viewing dying/death as<br/><br/>a status passage, a good passage is one in which all actors<br/><br/>accept the imminence of death, dying person and kin have resolved<br/><br/>socioemotional and material concerns, symptoms and pain are<br/><br/>controlled, and death occurs on time, i.e., it is neither too<br/><br/>abrupt nor unduly prolonged. In a bad death, the converse of one<br/><br/>or more of the foregoing occurs. Results suggest that restrictive<br/><br/>effects of certain Medicare regulations and the hospice's low<br/><br/>visibility in the community tend to limit the effectiveness of<br/><br/>hospice care. Nonetheless, it is argued that the hospice is a<br/><br/>successful and effective innovation, a humane alternative to the<br/><br/>impersonal and routinized management of dying and death in the<br/><br/>usual hospital or nursing home. Nurses emerged as the central<br/><br/>caregivers. Despite the high potential for stress and staff<br/><br/>burnout, there is little turnover among hospice nurses. Coping<br/><br/>mechanisms include emphasis on mutual support, open communication,<br/><br/>varied provision for breaks, respite, and a general<br/><br/>religious/spiritual faith.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:21:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:21:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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