Testing the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment (phases 1, 2, and 3) (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159823
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment (phases 1, 2, and 3) (DISS)
Abstract:
Testing the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment (phases 1, 2, and 3) (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1992
Author:Muller, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Grant/Riverside Methodist Hospitals
Contact Address:3535 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH, 43214, USA
Contact Telephone:614.566.5614
Some health care providers promote interventions to increase prenatal attachment. They assume prenatal attachment positively influence postnatal attachment and decreases parental dysfunction (Cranley, 1981; Fallon, 1987; Fletcher & Evans, 1983; Gaffney, 1988; Verny & Kelly, 1981). Yet, research has not demonstrated a correlation between prenatal and postnatal attachment (Cranley, 1981; Reading et al., 1984). However, these studies were not designed to examine the prenatal/postnatal link directly. The purpose of this study was to search specifically for evidence of a prenatal/postnatal attachment link by correlating attachment scores obtained during pregnancy (time 1) and one to two months after delivery (time 2).



Time 1 instruments were the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) and the Maternal Adjustment and Maternal Attitudes Scale (MAMA). The MAMA has five subscales: body image, symptoms, marital relations, attitudes toward sex, and attitudes towards pregnancy and the baby. Time 2 instruments were The Postnatal Attachment Inventory (PAI-2), The Maternal Separation Anxiety Scale (MSAS), How I Feel About the Baby Now Scale (HIFBN), and the postnatal version of the MAMA, the PPMAMA. As the PAI-2 is newly developed, the MSAS and HIFBN were included as additional indicators of postnatal attachment. All instruments except the PAI-2 had been used in previous research and demonstrated evidence of their validity and reliability.



The sample consisted of 196 young (mean age = 27.9 years), White (91%), well educated (mean = 15 years), married (88%), and employed (89%) women. Cronbach's alpha for all instruments was .80 or greater. PAi-2 scores correlated with HIFBN (r=.45, p<.001) and MSAS (r=.46, p<.001) scores, supporting the PAI-2 as a measure of postnatal attachment.



PAI and PAI-2 scores were positively correlated (r-.41, p<.001), with prenatal attachment explaining about 17% of postnatal attachment. PAI scores also correlated with maternal separation anxiety (r=.26, p<.001). The correlation between total MAMA scores and total PPMAMA scores was substantial (r=.62, p<.001). Maternal adaptation correlated with attachment before (r=.36, p<.001) and after (r=.30, p<.001) birth.



Attachment scores also correlated with specific MAMA and PPMAMA subscales. PAI scores correlated with specific MAMA and PPMAMA subscales. PAI scores correlated with body image (r=.27, p<.001), marital relations (r=.20, p<.001), and attitudes to pregnancy and the baby (r=.45, p<.001). PAI-2 scores correlated with marital relations (r=.27, p<.001) and attitudes to pregnancy and the baby (r=.47, p<.001).



The correlation between PAi and PAI-2 scores supported the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment. However, the size of the correlation indicated other factors, including marital relations and other variables yet to be identified, also influence postnatal attachment. This information may help nurses make decisions about the value of promoting prenatal attachment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment (phases 1, 2, and 3) (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159823-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment (phases 1, 2, and 3) (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Muller, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grant/Riverside Methodist Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3535 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH, 43214, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614.566.5614</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">muller.4@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Some health care providers promote interventions to increase prenatal attachment. They assume prenatal attachment positively influence postnatal attachment and decreases parental dysfunction (Cranley, 1981; Fallon, 1987; Fletcher &amp; Evans, 1983; Gaffney, 1988; Verny &amp; Kelly, 1981). Yet, research has not demonstrated a correlation between prenatal and postnatal attachment (Cranley, 1981; Reading et al., 1984). However, these studies were not designed to examine the prenatal/postnatal link directly. The purpose of this study was to search specifically for evidence of a prenatal/postnatal attachment link by correlating attachment scores obtained during pregnancy (time 1) and one to two months after delivery (time 2).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Time 1 instruments were the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) and the Maternal Adjustment and Maternal Attitudes Scale (MAMA). The MAMA has five subscales: body image, symptoms, marital relations, attitudes toward sex, and attitudes towards pregnancy and the baby. Time 2 instruments were The Postnatal Attachment Inventory (PAI-2), The Maternal Separation Anxiety Scale (MSAS), How I Feel About the Baby Now Scale (HIFBN), and the postnatal version of the MAMA, the PPMAMA. As the PAI-2 is newly developed, the MSAS and HIFBN were included as additional indicators of postnatal attachment. All instruments except the PAI-2 had been used in previous research and demonstrated evidence of their validity and reliability.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The sample consisted of 196 young (mean age = 27.9 years), White (91%), well educated (mean = 15 years), married (88%), and employed (89%) women. Cronbach's alpha for all instruments was .80 or greater. PAi-2 scores correlated with HIFBN (r=.45, p&lt;.001) and MSAS (r=.46, p&lt;.001) scores, supporting the PAI-2 as a measure of postnatal attachment.<br/><br/><br/><br/>PAI and PAI-2 scores were positively correlated (r-.41, p&lt;.001), with prenatal attachment explaining about 17% of postnatal attachment. PAI scores also correlated with maternal separation anxiety (r=.26, p&lt;.001). The correlation between total MAMA scores and total PPMAMA scores was substantial (r=.62, p&lt;.001). Maternal adaptation correlated with attachment before (r=.36, p&lt;.001) and after (r=.30, p&lt;.001) birth.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Attachment scores also correlated with specific MAMA and PPMAMA subscales. PAI scores correlated with specific MAMA and PPMAMA subscales. PAI scores correlated with body image (r=.27, p&lt;.001), marital relations (r=.20, p&lt;.001), and attitudes to pregnancy and the baby (r=.45, p&lt;.001). PAI-2 scores correlated with marital relations (r=.27, p&lt;.001) and attitudes to pregnancy and the baby (r=.47, p&lt;.001).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The correlation between PAi and PAI-2 scores supported the link between prenatal and postnatal attachment. However, the size of the correlation indicated other factors, including marital relations and other variables yet to be identified, also influence postnatal attachment. This information may help nurses make decisions about the value of promoting prenatal attachment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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