The use of no-suicide contracts to prevent suicidal behaviors in inpatient psychiatric settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159825
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The use of no-suicide contracts to prevent suicidal behaviors in inpatient psychiatric settings
Abstract:
The use of no-suicide contracts to prevent suicidal behaviors in inpatient psychiatric settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1995
Conference Date:April 1 - 3, 1995
Author:Drew, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Frances Payne Bolton SONCase Western Reserve University
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:2163682526
Objective: To describe the utilization of no-suicide contracts in inpatient psychiatric settings in OhioDesign: DescriptivePopulation, Sample, Setting, Years: The survey was sent to all licensed psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units within general hospitals in the State of Ohio during late 1994 to early 1995. Population of interest is adult psychiatric inpatients.Concept or Variables: No-suicide, no-harm, or safety contracting, Suicidal behaviorMethods: Mail survey developed by the investigator requested data regarding: Suicide prevention measures; If no-suicide contracting used: Form of contract, Type of staff who initiated contracting, Circumstances precipitating contracting, Estimate of incidence of suicidal behaviors per year in facility, Descriptive statisticsFindings: No-suicide contracts were used by 79% (n=66) of the responding hospitals. Nurses negotiated contracts with patients in all but one of the hospitals that use no-suicide contracts. Contracts are negotiated after suicidal ideation is expressed (83%), after self-harm (79%), following admission of a patient who has engaged in suicidal behavior (65%). Some hospitals use both written (74%) and verbal contracts (72%). These are more common than preprinted standardized contracts (15%). Fifty-three percent of respondents estimated an incidence of 10 or more suicidal behaviors per year in their inpatient settings The nature of the data (estimate of incidence of suicidal behavior) did not allow an accurate assessment of the association of contracting with the incidence of suicidal behavior.Conclusions: No-suicide contracting is a common practice among nurses in psychiatric inpatient settings in Ohio. Contracts are not used indiscriminately but are negotiated when high suicide risk is assessed. Contracts are generally individualized rather than standardized. Suicidal behavior within sheltered inpatient settings is not uncommon.Clinical and Research Implications: Estimates of 10 or more incidents of suicidal behavior in inpatient settings by over half the respondents reinforce the need for evaluation of suicide prevention techniques. It has been demonstrated that no-suicide contracting is common nursing practice in Ohio, yet there is little research that evaluates the effect of contracting on decisions regarding suicide. If it is an effective strategy, there is no research-based guidance regarding the process of contracting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
1-Apr-1995
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe use of no-suicide contracts to prevent suicidal behaviors in inpatient psychiatric settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159825-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The use of no-suicide contracts to prevent suicidal behaviors in inpatient psychiatric settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">April 1 - 3, 1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Drew, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SONCase Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">2163682526</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bxd12@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe the utilization of no-suicide contracts in inpatient psychiatric settings in OhioDesign: DescriptivePopulation, Sample, Setting, Years: The survey was sent to all licensed psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units within general hospitals in the State of Ohio during late 1994 to early 1995. Population of interest is adult psychiatric inpatients.Concept or Variables: No-suicide, no-harm, or safety contracting, Suicidal behaviorMethods: Mail survey developed by the investigator requested data regarding: Suicide prevention measures; If no-suicide contracting used: Form of contract, Type of staff who initiated contracting, Circumstances precipitating contracting, Estimate of incidence of suicidal behaviors per year in facility, Descriptive statisticsFindings: No-suicide contracts were used by 79% (n=66) of the responding hospitals. Nurses negotiated contracts with patients in all but one of the hospitals that use no-suicide contracts. Contracts are negotiated after suicidal ideation is expressed (83%), after self-harm (79%), following admission of a patient who has engaged in suicidal behavior (65%). Some hospitals use both written (74%) and verbal contracts (72%). These are more common than preprinted standardized contracts (15%). Fifty-three percent of respondents estimated an incidence of 10 or more suicidal behaviors per year in their inpatient settings The nature of the data (estimate of incidence of suicidal behavior) did not allow an accurate assessment of the association of contracting with the incidence of suicidal behavior.Conclusions: No-suicide contracting is a common practice among nurses in psychiatric inpatient settings in Ohio. Contracts are not used indiscriminately but are negotiated when high suicide risk is assessed. Contracts are generally individualized rather than standardized. Suicidal behavior within sheltered inpatient settings is not uncommon.Clinical and Research Implications: Estimates of 10 or more incidents of suicidal behavior in inpatient settings by over half the respondents reinforce the need for evaluation of suicide prevention techniques. It has been demonstrated that no-suicide contracting is common nursing practice in Ohio, yet there is little research that evaluates the effect of contracting on decisions regarding suicide. If it is an effective strategy, there is no research-based guidance regarding the process of contracting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:09Z-
dc.date.issued1995-04-01en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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