2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adults
Abstract:
Physical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Pomeroy, Sherry
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing 101 NB, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.882.0756
Purpose: This study examines the theoretical and methodological issues associated with physical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adults. Theoretical Framework: Current theoretical debates were examined, including social cognitive models. Sample: Research studies published between 1985 and 1999 were analyzed. Criteria for inclusion were: 1)the dependent variable was a direct or surrogate measure of physical activity; 2)the independent variable was an intervention to increase physical activity, exercise, strength, endurance, balance, mobility, physical activity behavior change, psychological/cognitive well-being, or cardiovascular fitness; and 3)subjects were adults age 65 or older. Method: Integrative review methods were used to analyze: 1) prototypes of methodologies; 2) characteristics of primary research studies; 3) quantitative analysis of results; and 4) limitations of studies and threats to validity. Results: Studies were mostly quasi-experimental with relatively small samples, therefore lacking in power to detect significant findings for multiple dependent variable measures or interaction effects. However, significant findings were reported when testing interventions to increase strength, flexibility, and endurance. Conclusions: 1)Conduct experimental studies with post intervention analysis; 2)design more studies to test muscle strength and endurance interventions; 3)target highest risk populations, such as the most sedentary, rural, and diverse populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pomeroy, Sherry</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing 101 NB, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.882.0756</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pomeroy@ksni.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examines the theoretical and methodological issues associated with physical activity intervention research with community-dwelling older adults. Theoretical Framework: Current theoretical debates were examined, including social cognitive models. Sample: Research studies published between 1985 and 1999 were analyzed. Criteria for inclusion were: 1)the dependent variable was a direct or surrogate measure of physical activity; 2)the independent variable was an intervention to increase physical activity, exercise, strength, endurance, balance, mobility, physical activity behavior change, psychological/cognitive well-being, or cardiovascular fitness; and 3)subjects were adults age 65 or older. Method: Integrative review methods were used to analyze: 1) prototypes of methodologies; 2) characteristics of primary research studies; 3) quantitative analysis of results; and 4) limitations of studies and threats to validity. Results: Studies were mostly quasi-experimental with relatively small samples, therefore lacking in power to detect significant findings for multiple dependent variable measures or interaction effects. However, significant findings were reported when testing interventions to increase strength, flexibility, and endurance. Conclusions: 1)Conduct experimental studies with post intervention analysis; 2)design more studies to test muscle strength and endurance interventions; 3)target highest risk populations, such as the most sedentary, rural, and diverse populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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