2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivating Change to Low Risk Drinking following Alcohol-Related Injury
Abstract:
Motivating Change to Low Risk Drinking following Alcohol-Related Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Dyehouse, Janice
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 231 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5269
The focus of Brief Intervention is to motivate non-dependent high-risk drinkers to change to low-risk drinking. This research evaluates the change by high-risk drinkers to low-risk drinking following hospitalization for an alcohol-related injury. Using an experimental design 114 subjects were randomly assigned to 3 groups, control and two intervention, SA and BC. The sample consists of 90 (79%) males and 24 (21%) females, ages 18-74 (M= 37) and with BAC from 12-400 (M= 132.04). Findings indicate that high- risk drinkers increased the number of weeks of low-risk drinking. At baseline controls had .88 weeks low risk drinking; at 3 months 2.94, 6 months 2.53, and 12 months 2.31 weeks. The SA group increased from 1.37 at baseline to 2.94 at 3 months, 6 months 2.39 and 12 months 2.95 weeks. The BC group increased from 1.43 baseline, to 2.73 at 3 months, 6 months 2.62, and 12 months 2.64 weeks. There was a significant decrease in binge drinking from baseline to 3, 6 , and 12 months and drinks per drinking day from baseline to 3 and 12 post injury across all groups. There was no significant difference between groups. Funded by the National Institute for Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivating Change to Low Risk Drinking following Alcohol-Related Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivating Change to Low Risk Drinking following Alcohol-Related Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dyehouse, Janice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 231 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5269</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.dyehouse@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The focus of Brief Intervention is to motivate non-dependent high-risk drinkers to change to low-risk drinking. This research evaluates the change by high-risk drinkers to low-risk drinking following hospitalization for an alcohol-related injury. Using an experimental design 114 subjects were randomly assigned to 3 groups, control and two intervention, SA and BC. The sample consists of 90 (79%) males and 24 (21%) females, ages 18-74 (M= 37) and with BAC from 12-400 (M= 132.04). Findings indicate that high- risk drinkers increased the number of weeks of low-risk drinking. At baseline controls had .88 weeks low risk drinking; at 3 months 2.94, 6 months 2.53, and 12 months 2.31 weeks. The SA group increased from 1.37 at baseline to 2.94 at 3 months, 6 months 2.39 and 12 months 2.95 weeks. The BC group increased from 1.43 baseline, to 2.73 at 3 months, 6 months 2.62, and 12 months 2.64 weeks. There was a significant decrease in binge drinking from baseline to 3, 6 , and 12 months and drinks per drinking day from baseline to 3 and 12 post injury across all groups. There was no significant difference between groups. Funded by the National Institute for Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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