2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159831
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recovery from addiction: A side-track transition
Abstract:
Recovery from addiction: A side-track transition
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Selder, F.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:
Contact Address:Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53202, USA
Life Transition Theory evolved from sixteen studies and is a description of reality reconstruction which incorporates or contains disrupting events. An interesting finding was that at least one person in each study did not report restructuring a new reality. These subjects were either waiting for a child to be discovered not dead (Death of a child study) or the person was waiting for a complete recovery from an injury/chronic illness. This observation led to what became known as a time-out or a sidetracked transition. The purpose of this study is to examine a side-tracked transition. The population is a group of women who have sustained recovery (drug/alcohol addiction) for a period of at least two years following enrollment in a transitional living program. The conceptual framework is Life Transition Theory. The research approach is in-depth interviewing and selected focus groups. The objective is to obtain a narrative of the recovery process of women who have sustained recovery. A major theme identified so far is limiting intrusion. There seems to be definitive benchmarks such as dreams of returning to drug use which precipitates a crisis in the recovery phase. The outcome of the research may inform the nature of the recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecovery from addiction: A side-track transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159831-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recovery from addiction: A side-track transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Selder, F.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Life Transition Theory evolved from sixteen studies and is a description of reality reconstruction which incorporates or contains disrupting events. An interesting finding was that at least one person in each study did not report restructuring a new reality. These subjects were either waiting for a child to be discovered not dead (Death of a child study) or the person was waiting for a complete recovery from an injury/chronic illness. This observation led to what became known as a time-out or a sidetracked transition. The purpose of this study is to examine a side-tracked transition. The population is a group of women who have sustained recovery (drug/alcohol addiction) for a period of at least two years following enrollment in a transitional living program. The conceptual framework is Life Transition Theory. The research approach is in-depth interviewing and selected focus groups. The objective is to obtain a narrative of the recovery process of women who have sustained recovery. A major theme identified so far is limiting intrusion. There seems to be definitive benchmarks such as dreams of returning to drug use which precipitates a crisis in the recovery phase. The outcome of the research may inform the nature of the recovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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