2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159832
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Residental preferences & eldercare: Some African-American elders' views
Abstract:
Residental preferences & eldercare: Some African-American elders' views
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Johnson, Rebecca
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing S413 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.884.4686
A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews was used to study sixteen elderly African-American elders aged over 60 years, cognitively intact, and participating in the congregate meal program at an inner city community center of a large Midwestern city. The purpose of the study was to explicate their views about nursing homes as a residential alternative, and their beliefs about eldercare. Their views were placed within the wider context of the elders' family situations and beliefs about eldercare. A brief demographic questionnaire was used asking about: age, gender, number of children, current residence type, and length of time in residence. Semi-structured, tape recorded interviews lasting approximately 30 minutes were conducted using open-ended questions. Data were transcribed verbatim from interview tape recordings for thematic analysis of explicit and implied themes. Themes and theme clusters were derived through consensus of the research team after data were analyzed separately by each team member. Major themes arising from the interview data include: nursing homes as "bad places", desire not to be a burden to children, inter-generational differences in lifestyle, and extended family involvement in eldercare. Implications of the findings for nurses will be discussed together with areas needing further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResidental preferences & eldercare: Some African-American elders' viewsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159832-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Residental preferences &amp; eldercare: Some African-American elders' views</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing S413 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.884.4686</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RAJohnson@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews was used to study sixteen elderly African-American elders aged over 60 years, cognitively intact, and participating in the congregate meal program at an inner city community center of a large Midwestern city. The purpose of the study was to explicate their views about nursing homes as a residential alternative, and their beliefs about eldercare. Their views were placed within the wider context of the elders' family situations and beliefs about eldercare. A brief demographic questionnaire was used asking about: age, gender, number of children, current residence type, and length of time in residence. Semi-structured, tape recorded interviews lasting approximately 30 minutes were conducted using open-ended questions. Data were transcribed verbatim from interview tape recordings for thematic analysis of explicit and implied themes. Themes and theme clusters were derived through consensus of the research team after data were analyzed separately by each team member. Major themes arising from the interview data include: nursing homes as &quot;bad places&quot;, desire not to be a burden to children, inter-generational differences in lifestyle, and extended family involvement in eldercare. Implications of the findings for nurses will be discussed together with areas needing further investigation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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