Effects of a behavioral intervention to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159834
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a behavioral intervention to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury
Abstract:
Effects of a behavioral intervention to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:King, Rosemarie
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern University Medical School
Contact Address:Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60208, USA
Contact Telephone:312.908.8038
Despite advances in skin care technology, the incidence of pressure ulcers (PU) after spinal cord injury (SCI) remains high. Effects of a behavioral intervention on knowledge and performance of skin care, PU risk, and PU development were examined using the Health Belief Model. Patients with SCI were assessed during rehabilitation, and 6 weeks and 4 months after hospitalization. Seventy-seven subjects were assigned randomly to a treatment condition. Standardized measures were used to assess knowledge, risk, and PU severity. All subjects received usual care and recorded skin care. The experimental group also participated in a behavioral intervention using contingency contracting and tailored interventions based on risk factors, perceived susceptibility, and perceived barriers. Chi-square and repeated measures ANOVA are used to compare group outcomes through 4 months. Preliminary results show greater knowledge (p <.05) and lower risk (p <.01) in the experimental group with time; and no significant difference in skin care performance. The PU incidence was 27% and 29%, respectively, in experimental and control subjects. Severe PUs developed in 14% of control and no experimental subjects. Findings will improve understanding of interventions to prevent PU in community-living persons with SCI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a behavioral intervention to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159834-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a behavioral intervention to decrease the incidence of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Rosemarie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern University Medical School</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60208, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.908.8038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbking@northwestern.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite advances in skin care technology, the incidence of pressure ulcers (PU) after spinal cord injury (SCI) remains high. Effects of a behavioral intervention on knowledge and performance of skin care, PU risk, and PU development were examined using the Health Belief Model. Patients with SCI were assessed during rehabilitation, and 6 weeks and 4 months after hospitalization. Seventy-seven subjects were assigned randomly to a treatment condition. Standardized measures were used to assess knowledge, risk, and PU severity. All subjects received usual care and recorded skin care. The experimental group also participated in a behavioral intervention using contingency contracting and tailored interventions based on risk factors, perceived susceptibility, and perceived barriers. Chi-square and repeated measures ANOVA are used to compare group outcomes through 4 months. Preliminary results show greater knowledge (p &lt;.05) and lower risk (p &lt;.01) in the experimental group with time; and no significant difference in skin care performance. The PU incidence was 27% and 29%, respectively, in experimental and control subjects. Severe PUs developed in 14% of control and no experimental subjects. Findings will improve understanding of interventions to prevent PU in community-living persons with SCI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:22:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:22:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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