2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159842
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Results of a minority fifth-grade abstinence education program
Abstract:
Results of a minority fifth-grade abstinence education program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Beaman, Margaret
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2331, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA
Contact Telephone:618.650.3980
Although teen pregnancy rates are at an all-time low, pregnancy among African-American teens continues to be a problem. Several community agencies in a Midwestern inner city implemented the "Sex Can Wait" 10-week abstinence program in three fifth grade classrooms. Two hypotheses guided the study based on Fishbein's Theory of Reasoned Action: 1) student participants will have significantly higher knowledge about puberty and sexual body parts and more positive attitudes toward delaying sexual activity compared to non-participants; and 2) participants in the 6-week parental component will report increased confidence in their sexuality communication with their children. The sample included 87 fifth graders, ranging in age from 10-13; 91% were African-American. Only the students' knowledge increased significantly. Although the 65% knowledge level of 31 parents indicated the need for accurate sex education, only five parents participated. Based on the results of the study, the pretest has been revised to encourage more valid pretest attitude responses and the parental component has been strengthened. These results indicate the need for stronger education with a more rigorous evaluation component.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResults of a minority fifth-grade abstinence education programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159842-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Results of a minority fifth-grade abstinence education program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beaman, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2331, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618.650.3980</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mbeaman@siue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although teen pregnancy rates are at an all-time low, pregnancy among African-American teens continues to be a problem. Several community agencies in a Midwestern inner city implemented the &quot;Sex Can Wait&quot; 10-week abstinence program in three fifth grade classrooms. Two hypotheses guided the study based on Fishbein's Theory of Reasoned Action: 1) student participants will have significantly higher knowledge about puberty and sexual body parts and more positive attitudes toward delaying sexual activity compared to non-participants; and 2) participants in the 6-week parental component will report increased confidence in their sexuality communication with their children. The sample included 87 fifth graders, ranging in age from 10-13; 91% were African-American. Only the students' knowledge increased significantly. Although the 65% knowledge level of 31 parents indicated the need for accurate sex education, only five parents participated. Based on the results of the study, the pretest has been revised to encourage more valid pretest attitude responses and the parental component has been strengthened. These results indicate the need for stronger education with a more rigorous evaluation component.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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