2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159843
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Late bloomers: Personal stories of young people who delayed sexual intercourse
Abstract:
Late bloomers: Personal stories of young people who delayed sexual intercourse
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Beausang, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU451B, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.0036
Problem: Objective measures such as age at first intercourse are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of sex education. However, little attention has been given to describing experiences of young people who delay sexual activity in qualitative ways. Purpose: To analyze personal stories of young people who were sexually abstinent throughout their adolescent years Method: Content analysis with a narrative perspective Sample: Data come from seven personal stories of growing up sexually written by young people who said they were virgins. The stories were a subset of a sample of 100 stories analyzed for a larger project. Findings: Common themes in the stories included positive relationships with parents and meaningful internal value systems. However, narrators also cited fears of sex, late maturation, and sequella of childhood sexual abuse as reasons why they were sexually abstinent. Conclusions: Late onset of sexual intercourse does not by itself imply healthy sexuality. Given the small sample size, additional research is needed to verify these conclusions. Nevertheless, these findings should prompt parents, educators, and researchers to consider the complexities of determining sexual health in adolescence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLate bloomers: Personal stories of young people who delayed sexual intercourseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159843-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Late bloomers: Personal stories of young people who delayed sexual intercourse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beausang, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU451B, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.0036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cbeausan@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Objective measures such as age at first intercourse are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of sex education. However, little attention has been given to describing experiences of young people who delay sexual activity in qualitative ways. Purpose: To analyze personal stories of young people who were sexually abstinent throughout their adolescent years Method: Content analysis with a narrative perspective Sample: Data come from seven personal stories of growing up sexually written by young people who said they were virgins. The stories were a subset of a sample of 100 stories analyzed for a larger project. Findings: Common themes in the stories included positive relationships with parents and meaningful internal value systems. However, narrators also cited fears of sex, late maturation, and sequella of childhood sexual abuse as reasons why they were sexually abstinent. Conclusions: Late onset of sexual intercourse does not by itself imply healthy sexuality. Given the small sample size, additional research is needed to verify these conclusions. Nevertheless, these findings should prompt parents, educators, and researchers to consider the complexities of determining sexual health in adolescence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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