2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159845
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Practice decisions related to suctioning intubated patients
Abstract:
Practice decisions related to suctioning intubated patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Berger, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Teaching Assistant
Contact Address:Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7844
Several research-based protocols for suctioning intubated patients have been published over the past decade. This descriptive study compared current suctioning practices to those recommendations. Twenty-two ICU nurses were randomly selected. All agreed to be observed during a routine suctioning event. Afterward, each nurse was interviewed to validate the observations and to clarify the nurse's decision-making regarding components of the suctioning procedure. Data were collected using a structured checklist; interviews were audiotaped. Hyperinflation and hyperventilation were associated (p<0.001) with whether the nurse used the in-line closed suctioning system or opened that system to use an external suction catheter, as was hyperoxygenation (p=0.02). Eight of the 12 nurses who did not hyperoxygenate considered this practice unnecessary unless the patient's oxygen saturation fell below 90% during suctioning. Ten nurses (45%) used normal saline lavage. Observed suctioning practices differed from evidence-based recommendations in a number of respects. The methodology of observing practice and then interviewing nurses about specific elements in their decision-making may be useful when attempting to foster a change towards evidence-based practice. Optimizing nurses' use of research evidence in practice requires both a research base that focuses on clinically important outcomes and an understanding of the factors that influence nurses' practice decisions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePractice decisions related to suctioning intubated patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159845-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Practice decisions related to suctioning intubated patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berger, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Teaching Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60612-7350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7844</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beberger@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Several research-based protocols for suctioning intubated patients have been published over the past decade. This descriptive study compared current suctioning practices to those recommendations. Twenty-two ICU nurses were randomly selected. All agreed to be observed during a routine suctioning event. Afterward, each nurse was interviewed to validate the observations and to clarify the nurse's decision-making regarding components of the suctioning procedure. Data were collected using a structured checklist; interviews were audiotaped. Hyperinflation and hyperventilation were associated (p&lt;0.001) with whether the nurse used the in-line closed suctioning system or opened that system to use an external suction catheter, as was hyperoxygenation (p=0.02). Eight of the 12 nurses who did not hyperoxygenate considered this practice unnecessary unless the patient's oxygen saturation fell below 90% during suctioning. Ten nurses (45%) used normal saline lavage. Observed suctioning practices differed from evidence-based recommendations in a number of respects. The methodology of observing practice and then interviewing nurses about specific elements in their decision-making may be useful when attempting to foster a change towards evidence-based practice. Optimizing nurses' use of research evidence in practice requires both a research base that focuses on clinically important outcomes and an understanding of the factors that influence nurses' practice decisions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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