2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159846
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are patient-centered computer network services legitimate nursing interventions?
Abstract:
Are patient-centered computer network services legitimate nursing interventions?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:Moehlman Bascom Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing & Engineering, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5251
Do computer-based nursing interventions constitute unique nursing interventions or do they simply employ computer technology as an alternative pathway for delivering already recognized interventions? Using a 4-component concept representation (activity (intentional service delivered by the nurse), delivery mode (manner in which the activity is applied), activity focus (phenomena on which the activity is focused) and recipient (implicit or explicit focus)), we examined five innovative nursing interventions: ComputerLink, Health Behavior Change, CHF-web, HeartCare and HeartCareII. Each of these includes one or more of the following: health information, tailoring algorithms, electronic mail and discussion groups, self-monitoring tools, and decision support. We applied Bakken's concept representation model to published reports of these five interventions. The activities observed include patient self-management of chronic disease and recovery from surgical procedures. The delivery modes include creating messages, tailoring health information, teaching, coaching, emotional support, encouraging peer interaction, and facilitating self-monitoring. The activity foci include congestive heart failure, self-care, pain, exercise, behavior modification and social isolation, and prevention of complications. When computer network services are systematically applied to address a common activity, the unique constellation of services, coupled with the multimedia display and asynchronous nature of communication, suggest that these services are unique nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre patient-centered computer network services legitimate nursing interventions?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159846-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Are patient-centered computer network services legitimate nursing interventions?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Moehlman Bascom Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing &amp; Engineering, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrennan@engr.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Do computer-based nursing interventions constitute unique nursing interventions or do they simply employ computer technology as an alternative pathway for delivering already recognized interventions? Using a 4-component concept representation (activity (intentional service delivered by the nurse), delivery mode (manner in which the activity is applied), activity focus (phenomena on which the activity is focused) and recipient (implicit or explicit focus)), we examined five innovative nursing interventions: ComputerLink, Health Behavior Change, CHF-web, HeartCare and HeartCareII. Each of these includes one or more of the following: health information, tailoring algorithms, electronic mail and discussion groups, self-monitoring tools, and decision support. We applied Bakken's concept representation model to published reports of these five interventions. The activities observed include patient self-management of chronic disease and recovery from surgical procedures. The delivery modes include creating messages, tailoring health information, teaching, coaching, emotional support, encouraging peer interaction, and facilitating self-monitoring. The activity foci include congestive heart failure, self-care, pain, exercise, behavior modification and social isolation, and prevention of complications. When computer network services are systematically applied to address a common activity, the unique constellation of services, coupled with the multimedia display and asynchronous nature of communication, suggest that these services are unique nursing interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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