Patterns of utilization of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among low-income African American women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159850
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of utilization of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among low-income African American women
Abstract:
Patterns of utilization of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among low-income African American women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Padonu, Georgia
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:517.355.4719
Few studies of HRT use have focused on African American women (AAW) and thus, little knowledge is available to guide strategies to support women in their decision making about (HRT). The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the self-reported patterns of use of five types of HRT: (1) Estrogen pill and Progestogen pill, (2) Estrogen patch and Progestogen pill, (3) Progestogen alone, (4) Estrogen Patch alone and (5) Estrogen Pill alone. Secondary analysis was performed from an original study of 197 low-income AAW, ages 40-60 years, typically reporting poverty level incomes defined as less than $15,000. Results indicated 54% reported never use of HRT; 26% past, but discontinued use. The 20% who reported current use identified estrogen/progestogen combinations most frequently (24%), followed by unopposed estrogen (18%).Frequencies for discontinuance were similar regardless of type of HRT used. Reason for discontinuance included side effects {42%},no longer needed {11%}, provider recommendation {11%}, reevaluation of safety concerns {9%}, and "other reasons"(27%). Implications for patient counseling and support will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of utilization of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among low-income African American womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159850-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of utilization of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among low-income African American women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Padonu, Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517.355.4719</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">padonug@msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Few studies of HRT use have focused on African American women (AAW) and thus, little knowledge is available to guide strategies to support women in their decision making about (HRT). The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the self-reported patterns of use of five types of HRT: (1) Estrogen pill and Progestogen pill, (2) Estrogen patch and Progestogen pill, (3) Progestogen alone, (4) Estrogen Patch alone and (5) Estrogen Pill alone. Secondary analysis was performed from an original study of 197 low-income AAW, ages 40-60 years, typically reporting poverty level incomes defined as less than $15,000. Results indicated 54% reported never use of HRT; 26% past, but discontinued use. The 20% who reported current use identified estrogen/progestogen combinations most frequently (24%), followed by unopposed estrogen (18%).Frequencies for discontinuance were similar regardless of type of HRT used. Reason for discontinuance included side effects {42%},no longer needed {11%}, provider recommendation {11%}, reevaluation of safety concerns {9%}, and &quot;other reasons&quot;(27%). Implications for patient counseling and support will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.