2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159856
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identity Impairment Model of Risk Behaviors in Mexican American Women
Abstract:
Identity Impairment Model of Risk Behaviors in Mexican American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Stein, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-936-6162
Co-Authors:Colleen M Corte, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Nora Arato, PhD, MA, BA, Clinical Manager
Hispanic women experience disproportionate rates of cardiovascular, metabolic and weight-related diseases. Although a number of factors contribute to these health disparities, modifiable health behaviors are significant contributors. This pilot study focuses on disordered eating, tobacco, and alcohol use and examines the predictive power of the identity impairment model in explaining this triad of risk behaviors. To test the hypothesis that a self-concept is comprised of a highly interrelated collection of few positive and many negative self-cognitions will contribute to the development of a fat self-schema, which in turn, will predict disordered eating, tobacco and alcohol use behaviors. A sample of 66 Mexican American women (age M=24.1 years, education M=16.9 years) completed measures of the self-concept and disordered eating behaviors. A subsample of 30 women returned to complete smoking and alcohol use measures. Markus' Closed Ended Self-Schema measure was used to identify women with and without a fat self-schema. Biserial correlation between the fat self-schema and Binge Eating Scale (BES) score was moderately strong (r=0. 42, p<.05). Logistic regression and path analyses showed that the number of positive and negative self-schemas (but not interrelatedness) predicted availability of the fat self-schema. The fat schema and interrelatedness directly predicted BES scores (R2=0.33, p<.01). Although the model was not significant in predicting alcohol and tobacco use with the subsample data, the binge eating score was correlated with drinks per month (r=0.38, p <.05), hazardous use (AUDIT, r=0.40, p<.05), and weakly correlated with cigarettes per month (r=0.19, p=ns). Results are consistent with the identity impairment model and suggest that disturbances in the overall array of self-cognitions contribute to disordered eating, which in turn is associated with tobacco and alcohol use. The self-concept may be an important focus for nursing health promotion intervention. P20NR008367
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentity Impairment Model of Risk Behaviors in Mexican American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159856-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identity Impairment Model of Risk Behaviors in Mexican American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stein, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-936-6162</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kfarchau@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen M Corte, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Nora Arato, PhD, MA, BA, Clinical Manager</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hispanic women experience disproportionate rates of cardiovascular, metabolic and weight-related diseases. Although a number of factors contribute to these health disparities, modifiable health behaviors are significant contributors. This pilot study focuses on disordered eating, tobacco, and alcohol use and examines the predictive power of the identity impairment model in explaining this triad of risk behaviors. To test the hypothesis that a self-concept is comprised of a highly interrelated collection of few positive and many negative self-cognitions will contribute to the development of a fat self-schema, which in turn, will predict disordered eating, tobacco and alcohol use behaviors. A sample of 66 Mexican American women (age M=24.1 years, education M=16.9 years) completed measures of the self-concept and disordered eating behaviors. A subsample of 30 women returned to complete smoking and alcohol use measures. Markus' Closed Ended Self-Schema measure was used to identify women with and without a fat self-schema. Biserial correlation between the fat self-schema and Binge Eating Scale (BES) score was moderately strong (r=0. 42, p&lt;.05). Logistic regression and path analyses showed that the number of positive and negative self-schemas (but not interrelatedness) predicted availability of the fat self-schema. The fat schema and interrelatedness directly predicted BES scores (R2=0.33, p&lt;.01). Although the model was not significant in predicting alcohol and tobacco use with the subsample data, the binge eating score was correlated with drinks per month (r=0.38, p &lt;.05), hazardous use (AUDIT, r=0.40, p&lt;.05), and weakly correlated with cigarettes per month (r=0.19, p=ns). Results are consistent with the identity impairment model and suggest that disturbances in the overall array of self-cognitions contribute to disordered eating, which in turn is associated with tobacco and alcohol use. The self-concept may be an important focus for nursing health promotion intervention. P20NR008367</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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