2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159857
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Access to information: A concept analysis
Abstract:
Access to information: A concept analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thielman, Jane, MSN, FNP, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:SON - H6/296 Clinical Sciences Center, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-265-1493
Background and Purpose. This paper presents an analysis of the concept access to information, as it was used in the nursing literature between 1999 and 2004. An understanding of what nurses consider having access to information is crucial to guide the creation of technologies to provide nurses with information resources. Method. The analysis was conducted using the evolutionary method of concept analysis. The evolutionary method attempts to characterize a concept within a defined context and time period. The information age and advent of digital information resources have significantly shaped and changed ideas about what it means to have access to information, making the evolutionary method especially appropriate for analysis of this concept. Sample. Candidate articles were discovered by electronic search of the 1999-2004 nursing literature, using the MeSH terms ôaccess to informationö and ônursingö. The potential sample pool was extended by the addition of articles cited in those already located, including two articles dated earlier than 1999, which were included for their historical significance and relevance. A final sample of seventeen articles resulted. The sample included research and non-research articles. Results. Nurses considered information accessible when it was findable and readable, of high quality, and had a clear and relevant purpose. Convenience, pertaining to the time and location in which the information was needed, was also an important attribute of access to information. The expected consequences of having access to information were positive, including improvements in nursing care, benefit to the nursing discipline, and improved patient outcomes regarding coping, decision making, and health. Conclusions. The conceptualization of access to information revealed by analysis of the nursing literature is clear and actionable. Attention to this conceptualization of access to information will be critical in designing technologies to address nurses' information needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccess to information: A concept analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159857-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Access to information: A concept analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thielman, Jane, MSN, FNP, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - H6/296 Clinical Sciences Center, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-265-1493</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpthielman@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Purpose. This paper presents an analysis of the concept access to information, as it was used in the nursing literature between 1999 and 2004. An understanding of what nurses consider having access to information is crucial to guide the creation of technologies to provide nurses with information resources. Method. The analysis was conducted using the evolutionary method of concept analysis. The evolutionary method attempts to characterize a concept within a defined context and time period. The information age and advent of digital information resources have significantly shaped and changed ideas about what it means to have access to information, making the evolutionary method especially appropriate for analysis of this concept. Sample. Candidate articles were discovered by electronic search of the 1999-2004 nursing literature, using the MeSH terms &ocirc;access to information&ouml; and &ocirc;nursing&ouml;. The potential sample pool was extended by the addition of articles cited in those already located, including two articles dated earlier than 1999, which were included for their historical significance and relevance. A final sample of seventeen articles resulted. The sample included research and non-research articles. Results. Nurses considered information accessible when it was findable and readable, of high quality, and had a clear and relevant purpose. Convenience, pertaining to the time and location in which the information was needed, was also an important attribute of access to information. The expected consequences of having access to information were positive, including improvements in nursing care, benefit to the nursing discipline, and improved patient outcomes regarding coping, decision making, and health. Conclusions. The conceptualization of access to information revealed by analysis of the nursing literature is clear and actionable. Attention to this conceptualization of access to information will be critical in designing technologies to address nurses' information needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:23:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:23:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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