Stress, Optimism, and Social Support: Impact on Immune Responses in Women with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159859
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Optimism, and Social Support: Impact on Immune Responses in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Stress, Optimism, and Social Support: Impact on Immune Responses in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Von Ah, Diane, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing - NU 338, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-4595
Co-Authors:Duck-Hee Kang, PhD, FAAN, Professor and Janet S. Carpenter, PhD, Associate Professor
PURPOSE: The study purpose was to examine the impact of perceived stress, and the direct and stress-buffering effect of optimism and satisfaction with social support on immune responses in women with breast cancer after surgery.

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Lazarus & Folkman's cognitive appraisal model of stress and coping was used.

METHODS: 54 women with newly diagnosed Stage 0-III breast cancer provided a blood sample and completed questionnaires including demographic and medical information, stress, optimism, and satisfaction with social support. Blood was used to determine natural killer cell activity (NKCA) using chromium-51 assay at three effector-to-target ratios (100:1, 50:1, 25:1), and IFN-g and IL-2 concentration. Data were collected at the first post-operative appointment occurring on average 19 days after surgery. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and two-step hierarchical multiple regression controlling for age, stage of disease, and time since surgery.

RESULTS: Participants reported moderate levels of psychological stress and optimism and high satisfaction with social support. Higher levels of stress were directly associated with decrements in NKCA, IFN-g and IL-2. Optimism, on the other hand, moderated the impact of stress on NKCA at all effector-to-target ratios but did not affect IFN-g and IL-2. Women with lower levels of optimism and high stress had significantly lower levels of NKCA. Satisfaction with social support did not have a direct or stress-buffering impact on immune responses.

CONCLUSION: Stress had a deleterious affect on immune responses. Optimism moderated the impact of stress on NKCA. These findings suggest interventions aimed at both reducing stress and enhancing dispositional optimism in women with breast cancer will be most effective in promoting optimal immune responses.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: Funded in part by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Birmingham Affiliate and grant # T32 NR007066 from NINR, NIH to the Indiana University School of Nursing.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Optimism, and Social Support: Impact on Immune Responses in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159859-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress, Optimism, and Social Support: Impact on Immune Responses in Women with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Von Ah, Diane, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - NU 338, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-4595</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dvonah@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Duck-Hee Kang, PhD, FAAN, Professor and Janet S. Carpenter, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The study purpose was to examine the impact of perceived stress, and the direct and stress-buffering effect of optimism and satisfaction with social support on immune responses in women with breast cancer after surgery. <br/><br/>THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Lazarus &amp; Folkman's cognitive appraisal model of stress and coping was used.<br/><br/>METHODS: 54 women with newly diagnosed Stage 0-III breast cancer provided a blood sample and completed questionnaires including demographic and medical information, stress, optimism, and satisfaction with social support. Blood was used to determine natural killer cell activity (NKCA) using chromium-51 assay at three effector-to-target ratios (100:1, 50:1, 25:1), and IFN-g and IL-2 concentration. Data were collected at the first post-operative appointment occurring on average 19 days after surgery. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and two-step hierarchical multiple regression controlling for age, stage of disease, and time since surgery.<br/><br/>RESULTS: Participants reported moderate levels of psychological stress and optimism and high satisfaction with social support. Higher levels of stress were directly associated with decrements in NKCA, IFN-g and IL-2. Optimism, on the other hand, moderated the impact of stress on NKCA at all effector-to-target ratios but did not affect IFN-g and IL-2. Women with lower levels of optimism and high stress had significantly lower levels of NKCA. Satisfaction with social support did not have a direct or stress-buffering impact on immune responses. <br/><br/>CONCLUSION: Stress had a deleterious affect on immune responses. Optimism moderated the impact of stress on NKCA. These findings suggest interventions aimed at both reducing stress and enhancing dispositional optimism in women with breast cancer will be most effective in promoting optimal immune responses.<br/><br/>ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: Funded in part by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Birmingham Affiliate and grant # T32 NR007066 from NINR, NIH to the Indiana University School of Nursing.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.