Developing Measures of Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Health Behaviors for Pregnant African-Americans and Latinas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Measures of Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Health Behaviors for Pregnant African-Americans and Latinas
Abstract:
Developing Measures of Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Health Behaviors for Pregnant African-Americans and Latinas
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Vonderheid, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7982
Co-Authors:Kathleen F. Norr, PhD, Professor; Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Faculty; Carrie Klima, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Arden S. Handler, DrPH, Professor
Significance: Substantial disparities in infant mortality and low birth weight in the US partly reflect a standard of prenatal care that has failed to address these and other adverse perinatal outcomes. Prenatal care provides a unique window of opportunity to improve women's knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors during pregnancy. CenteringPregnancy is an innovative model of group prenatal care that emphasizes health promotion content. Implemented in more than 50 sites in the US and Canada, CenteringPregnancy has not been rigorously evaluated. The development of comprehensive measures of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors are needed to test the effectiveness of CenteringPregnancy. Purpose: To develop measures of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors related to pregnancy for African-American and Latina pregnant women with low levels of education. Sample: 36 women have been recruited from prenatal clinics serving low-income African-American and Latina women in a large Midwestern city. Methods: Review of the content by a panel of professional experts and cognitive interviews with women. Experts completed evaluations of the measures followed by revisions. Content validity indices > .80 established validity. Next, interviews began to determine comprehensibility of the measures among women. Results: Results indicate that although feedback from professional experts supported validity of the health behaviors measure, the target population still had a significant amount of difficulty comprehending the questions. These findings are important, because in many cases the wording tested was drawn directly from questions used commonly in state and national surveys. Women had difficulty understanding items related to servings from the four food groups and descriptions of physical activities. For example, women were unable to describe a serving of dairy foods. Differences between African-American and Latina women in their interpretation of items also were found. The contribution of these various methods to increasing the validity of the measures will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Measures of Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Health Behaviors for Pregnant African-Americans and Latinasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159860-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Measures of Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Health Behaviors for Pregnant African-Americans and Latinas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vonderheid, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7982</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vonde@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen F. Norr, PhD, Professor; Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Faculty; Carrie Klima, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Arden S. Handler, DrPH, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: Substantial disparities in infant mortality and low birth weight in the US partly reflect a standard of prenatal care that has failed to address these and other adverse perinatal outcomes. Prenatal care provides a unique window of opportunity to improve women's knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors during pregnancy. CenteringPregnancy is an innovative model of group prenatal care that emphasizes health promotion content. Implemented in more than 50 sites in the US and Canada, CenteringPregnancy has not been rigorously evaluated. The development of comprehensive measures of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors are needed to test the effectiveness of CenteringPregnancy. Purpose: To develop measures of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors related to pregnancy for African-American and Latina pregnant women with low levels of education. Sample: 36 women have been recruited from prenatal clinics serving low-income African-American and Latina women in a large Midwestern city. Methods: Review of the content by a panel of professional experts and cognitive interviews with women. Experts completed evaluations of the measures followed by revisions. Content validity indices &gt; .80 established validity. Next, interviews began to determine comprehensibility of the measures among women. Results: Results indicate that although feedback from professional experts supported validity of the health behaviors measure, the target population still had a significant amount of difficulty comprehending the questions. These findings are important, because in many cases the wording tested was drawn directly from questions used commonly in state and national surveys. Women had difficulty understanding items related to servings from the four food groups and descriptions of physical activities. For example, women were unable to describe a serving of dairy foods. Differences between African-American and Latina women in their interpretation of items also were found. The contribution of these various methods to increasing the validity of the measures will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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