A Study of Community-Residing Older Adults' Knowledge and Views on Depression and Health Care Seeking Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159863
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study of Community-Residing Older Adults' Knowledge and Views on Depression and Health Care Seeking Behaviors
Abstract:
A Study of Community-Residing Older Adults' Knowledge and Views on Depression and Health Care Seeking Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Weberski, Jill, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Francis Medical Center
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 511 NE Greenleaf, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA
Contact Telephone:3096249147
While there is evidence that treatment for depression improves the quality life of many older
adults, a significant number of older adults with depressive symptoms are neither diagnosed nor
treated in primary care. As the number of older adults increases to twenty percent of the
population by the year 2020, it is imperative that nurses assess older adults' views about barriers
to and factors that may interfere with health care seeking behaviors for depression. The purpose
of this study was to explore the concept of depression in community-residing older adults and to
further explore the Health Belief Model variables of perceived susceptibility, seriousness,
benefits, barriers, and health motivation. An integrated quantitative and qualitative design was
implemented to enable the widest range of participants' views to be expressed. Quantitative data
was collected using a fourteen-item questionnaire. The questions addressed variables identified
in the literature that are associated with health-care seeking behaviors for depression. Qualitative
information was collected by asking participants a series of questions in a focus group interview.
The study population included eight older adults who met the inclusion criteria and who agreed
to participate. Descriptive statistics was utilized to analyze quantitative data. Qualitative
information was transcribed verbatim to identify themes relevant to each focus group question.
Study findings indicated that the Health Belief Model could provide a useful framework for
developing theory-based interventions to improve depression awareness in older adults and to
increase the reporting of depressive symptoms among this population. These outcomes are of
particular importance to advance practice nurses who play a vital role in health promotion and to
others who are interested in decreasing the societal costs of this disease. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study of Community-Residing Older Adults' Knowledge and Views on Depression and Health Care Seeking Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159863-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Study of Community-Residing Older Adults' Knowledge and Views on Depression and Health Care Seeking Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weberski, Jill, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Francis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 511 NE Greenleaf, Peoria, IL, 61603, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3096249147</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jweberski@sbcglobal.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While there is evidence that treatment for depression improves the quality life of many older <br/>adults, a significant number of older adults with depressive symptoms are neither diagnosed nor <br/>treated in primary care. As the number of older adults increases to twenty percent of the <br/>population by the year 2020, it is imperative that nurses assess older adults' views about barriers <br/>to and factors that may interfere with health care seeking behaviors for depression. The purpose <br/>of this study was to explore the concept of depression in community-residing older adults and to <br/>further explore the Health Belief Model variables of perceived susceptibility, seriousness, <br/>benefits, barriers, and health motivation. An integrated quantitative and qualitative design was <br/>implemented to enable the widest range of participants' views to be expressed. Quantitative data <br/>was collected using a fourteen-item questionnaire. The questions addressed variables identified <br/>in the literature that are associated with health-care seeking behaviors for depression. Qualitative <br/>information was collected by asking participants a series of questions in a focus group interview.<br/>The study population included eight older adults who met the inclusion criteria and who agreed <br/>to participate. Descriptive statistics was utilized to analyze quantitative data. Qualitative <br/>information was transcribed verbatim to identify themes relevant to each focus group question. <br/>Study findings indicated that the Health Belief Model could provide a useful framework for <br/>developing theory-based interventions to improve depression awareness in older adults and to <br/>increase the reporting of depressive symptoms among this population. These outcomes are of <br/>particular importance to advance practice nurses who play a vital role in health promotion and to <br/>others who are interested in decreasing the societal costs of this disease. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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