2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of the Rapid GAPS for Adolescent Risk Assessment
Abstract:
Implementation of the Rapid GAPS for Adolescent Risk Assessment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Yi, Chin Hwa, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 879 Greenhills Dr, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
Contact Telephone:734-620-3871
Co-Authors:Kristy Martyn, PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP, Assistant Professor and Cynthia Darling-Fisher, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor
Objective: To describe the clinical use of the Rapid GAPS health risk questionnaire, a condensed version of the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) assessment form, in school based health centers (SBHC). Methods: A self-administered 17-18 item health risk screening form, Rapid GAPS, was developed and then completed by middle school (n=106) and alternative high school (n=39) adolescents in SBHCs located in southeast Michigan. A chart audit was conducted to obtain adolescent self-reported risk behaviors and provider documented intervention of the reported risk behaviors/factors. Results: Descriptive statistics indicated the mean number of self-reported risk behaviors for 9-15 year olds and 16-20 year olds were 2.3 +/- 1.4 and 6.3 +/- 1.9 respectively. The most common risk behaviors/factors reported by 9-15 year olds were not wearing protective gear or helmet (77%), feeling very sad (30%), and desiring more information regarding abstinence, HIV/AIDS, or other sexually transmitted diseases (26%). For 16-20 year olds, the most prevalent risk behaviors/factors were sexual intercourse (97%), getting drunk (74%), and tobacco use (67%). Providers documented intervention for 89.5% of 9-15 year olds and 95% of 16-20 year olds. More referrals were made for 16-20 year olds (43.6%) than for 9-15 year olds (26.4%). Conclusion: The Rapid GAPS was used to identify the most prevalent risk behaviors/factors of adolescents in the SBHCs. Using the Rapid GAPS, the providers were able to address and document majority of the reported risk behaviors/factors during a single visit. With the data collected, the SBHCs can tailor specific preventative education and intervention programs that are geared to meet the specific interests of the student population. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of the Rapid GAPS for Adolescent Risk Assessmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of the Rapid GAPS for Adolescent Risk Assessment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yi, Chin Hwa, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 879 Greenhills Dr, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-620-3871</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ginayi@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristy Martyn, PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP, Assistant Professor and Cynthia Darling-Fisher, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe the clinical use of the Rapid GAPS health risk questionnaire, a condensed version of the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) assessment form, in school based health centers (SBHC). Methods: A self-administered 17-18 item health risk screening form, Rapid GAPS, was developed and then completed by middle school (n=106) and alternative high school (n=39) adolescents in SBHCs located in southeast Michigan. A chart audit was conducted to obtain adolescent self-reported risk behaviors and provider documented intervention of the reported risk behaviors/factors. Results: Descriptive statistics indicated the mean number of self-reported risk behaviors for 9-15 year olds and 16-20 year olds were 2.3 +/- 1.4 and 6.3 +/- 1.9 respectively. The most common risk behaviors/factors reported by 9-15 year olds were not wearing protective gear or helmet (77%), feeling very sad (30%), and desiring more information regarding abstinence, HIV/AIDS, or other sexually transmitted diseases (26%). For 16-20 year olds, the most prevalent risk behaviors/factors were sexual intercourse (97%), getting drunk (74%), and tobacco use (67%). Providers documented intervention for 89.5% of 9-15 year olds and 95% of 16-20 year olds. More referrals were made for 16-20 year olds (43.6%) than for 9-15 year olds (26.4%). Conclusion: The Rapid GAPS was used to identify the most prevalent risk behaviors/factors of adolescents in the SBHCs. Using the Rapid GAPS, the providers were able to address and document majority of the reported risk behaviors/factors during a single visit. With the data collected, the SBHCs can tailor specific preventative education and intervention programs that are geared to meet the specific interests of the student population. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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