2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159868
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Testing of the Resourcefulness Scale for Older Adults
Abstract:
Development and Testing of the Resourcefulness Scale for Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RN, C, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:SON - H6/246 CSC, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-3612
Co-Authors:Chien-Yu Lai, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Sukuma Tithiphontumrong, PhD, RN, Instructor
Resourcefulness is the ability to independently perform daily tasks (personal resourcefulness) and to seek help from others when unable to function independently (social resourcefulness). Both personal and social resourcefulness are important for health promotion and maintenance and should be viewed as two complementary dimensions, both of which impact physical and psychological health. Elders who use both personal and social resourcefulness skills have been found to function better in their daily activities than those who use either personal or social resourcefulness alone. Although, the two forms of resourcefulness are theoretically related, no current measure captures both simultaneously. Purpose: This two-phase study involved development and testing of a Resourcefulness Scale for elders from existing measures of personal and social resourcefulness, Rosenbaum's Self Control Scale and Zauszniewski's Help-Seeking Resource Scale. The goal was to establish an instrument for comprehensive assessment of resourcefulness skills and for examining the separate and combined effects of both forms of resourcefulness on health outcomes. Methods: Pooled data from two studies of chronically ill elders (N=451) living in retirement communities were randomly split into two demographically similar samples: the measure was developed in phase one and validated in phase two. Results: The Resourcefulness Scale has acceptable internal consistency (&alpha =.85). Two correlated subscales reflecting personal and social resourcefulness (r =.41) were confirmed with 19% of the total variance explained by the first factor (personal resourcefulness) and 8% explained by the second (social resourcefulness). Higher order factor analysis suggested that personal and social resourcefulness are components of a larger construct, resourcefulness. Conclusion: The findings provide initial evidence for the reliability and construct validity of the Resourcefulness Scale for chronically ill elders. Further testing is recommended with diverse samples of younger and middle-aged adults, including those with diverse ethnic backgrounds and health conditions, as well as healthy or frailer elders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Testing of the Resourcefulness Scale for Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159868-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Testing of the Resourcefulness Scale for Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RN, C, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - H6/246 CSC, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-3612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chien-Yu Lai, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor and Sukuma Tithiphontumrong, PhD, RN, Instructor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Resourcefulness is the ability to independently perform daily tasks (personal resourcefulness) and to seek help from others when unable to function independently (social resourcefulness). Both personal and social resourcefulness are important for health promotion and maintenance and should be viewed as two complementary dimensions, both of which impact physical and psychological health. Elders who use both personal and social resourcefulness skills have been found to function better in their daily activities than those who use either personal or social resourcefulness alone. Although, the two forms of resourcefulness are theoretically related, no current measure captures both simultaneously. Purpose: This two-phase study involved development and testing of a Resourcefulness Scale for elders from existing measures of personal and social resourcefulness, Rosenbaum's Self Control Scale and Zauszniewski's Help-Seeking Resource Scale. The goal was to establish an instrument for comprehensive assessment of resourcefulness skills and for examining the separate and combined effects of both forms of resourcefulness on health outcomes. Methods: Pooled data from two studies of chronically ill elders (N=451) living in retirement communities were randomly split into two demographically similar samples: the measure was developed in phase one and validated in phase two. Results: The Resourcefulness Scale has acceptable internal consistency (&amp;alpha =.85). Two correlated subscales reflecting personal and social resourcefulness (r =.41) were confirmed with 19% of the total variance explained by the first factor (personal resourcefulness) and 8% explained by the second (social resourcefulness). Higher order factor analysis suggested that personal and social resourcefulness are components of a larger construct, resourcefulness. Conclusion: The findings provide initial evidence for the reliability and construct validity of the Resourcefulness Scale for chronically ill elders. Further testing is recommended with diverse samples of younger and middle-aged adults, including those with diverse ethnic backgrounds and health conditions, as well as healthy or frailer elders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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