Active In Spite Of: Experiences of Patients with Cancer Using Guided Imagery or Planned Rest

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159869
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Active In Spite Of: Experiences of Patients with Cancer Using Guided Imagery or Planned Rest
Abstract:
Active In Spite Of: Experiences of Patients with Cancer Using Guided Imagery or Planned Rest
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Adeola, Mopelola, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:502 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
Contact Telephone:765-494-4033
Co-Authors:M.T. Adeola, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; C. Baird, Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; C.G. Shields, Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; U. Henry, Child Development and Family Studies
Approximately 50% of cancer patients report that pain is under treated. Inadequately treated cancer pain is associated with increased distress and poor quality of life for patients and families. Cognitive-behavioral therapy may reduce pain and increase ability to cope with cancer-related symptoms. The purposes of this secondary analysis are to examine symptoms and activity level of adults with cancer, while gaining a greater understanding of the experiences of using guided imagery with rest (GIR) and planned rest. The gate-control theory of pain guided the development of interventions. GIR may affect higher brain centers by blocking transmission of nociceptic stimuli. GIR may initiate cognitive processes like distraction. Both GIR and planned rest may result in a reduction in autonomic nervous system responses, resulting in skeletal muscle relaxation and decreased uncomfortable sensations. This is a secondary qualitative analysis of data from a longitudinal experimental study. Eleven adults (m age = 61.7 yrs) undergoing cancer treatments (no surgeries) with moderate pain were randomized to intervention and control intervention groups. The GIR intervention consisted of 13-minute audio-taped scenario, twice a day. The alternate intervention was planned sitting twice a day for 13 minutes. Measures for this qualitative analysis included daily open-ended questions to note symptoms, activities, and experiences using the interventions. Analysis included content analysis of activities and symptoms and comparative analysis of experiences with interventions. Findings included the high level of activity noted by all participants. Appreciation of the increased time for reflection was mentioned by participants in the planned rest group. Those in the GIR group reported less pain and increased rest. However, the GIR group also reported more symptoms of nausea, fatigue and depression. Findings indicate that participating in both imagery and planned rest have benefits. Providers must evaluate whether symptoms interfere with desired activities, and may find imagery or relaxation beneficial.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleActive In Spite Of: Experiences of Patients with Cancer Using Guided Imagery or Planned Resten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159869-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Active In Spite Of: Experiences of Patients with Cancer Using Guided Imagery or Planned Rest</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adeola, Mopelola, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">502 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765-494-4033</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">adeolam@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.T. Adeola, Nursing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; C. Baird, Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; C.G. Shields, Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; U. Henry, Child Development and Family Studies</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 50% of cancer patients report that pain is under treated. Inadequately treated cancer pain is associated with increased distress and poor quality of life for patients and families. Cognitive-behavioral therapy may reduce pain and increase ability to cope with cancer-related symptoms. The purposes of this secondary analysis are to examine symptoms and activity level of adults with cancer, while gaining a greater understanding of the experiences of using guided imagery with rest (GIR) and planned rest. The gate-control theory of pain guided the development of interventions. GIR may affect higher brain centers by blocking transmission of nociceptic stimuli. GIR may initiate cognitive processes like distraction. Both GIR and planned rest may result in a reduction in autonomic nervous system responses, resulting in skeletal muscle relaxation and decreased uncomfortable sensations. This is a secondary qualitative analysis of data from a longitudinal experimental study. Eleven adults (m age = 61.7 yrs) undergoing cancer treatments (no surgeries) with moderate pain were randomized to intervention and control intervention groups. The GIR intervention consisted of 13-minute audio-taped scenario, twice a day. The alternate intervention was planned sitting twice a day for 13 minutes. Measures for this qualitative analysis included daily open-ended questions to note symptoms, activities, and experiences using the interventions. Analysis included content analysis of activities and symptoms and comparative analysis of experiences with interventions. Findings included the high level of activity noted by all participants. Appreciation of the increased time for reflection was mentioned by participants in the planned rest group. Those in the GIR group reported less pain and increased rest. However, the GIR group also reported more symptoms of nausea, fatigue and depression. Findings indicate that participating in both imagery and planned rest have benefits. Providers must evaluate whether symptoms interfere with desired activities, and may find imagery or relaxation beneficial.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.