Do Central Adiposity Measures Predict Lifestyle Patterns and Knowledge in Obese Patients with Heart Failure?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159870
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Central Adiposity Measures Predict Lifestyle Patterns and Knowledge in Obese Patients with Heart Failure?
Abstract:
Do Central Adiposity Measures Predict Lifestyle Patterns and Knowledge in Obese Patients with Heart Failure?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Title:Nursing Research and Innovation
Contact Address:9500 Euclid Avenue, Mailcode J3-4, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA
Contact Telephone:216-444-7028
Co-Authors:N.M. Albert, J. Forney, E. Slifcak, Nursing Research and Innovation, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J.F. Bena, A.S. Tang, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;
Purpose: To examine relationships between central adiposity measures (waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, and metabolic syndrome status) and patient characteristics, lifestyle patterns (diet adherence and functional status) and knowledge of diet, exercise and adiposity distribution to determine if central adiposity measures are better predictors than body mass index of factors that influence cardiovascular morbidity risk. Conceptual Model: In the 'obesity paradox' in heart failure, obesity is a risk factor for developing heart failure; yet once diagnosed, obese heart failure patients have longer survival than non-obese patients. The obesity paradox was based on general obesity using body mass index status. It is unknown if central adiposity measures are better predictors of variables associated with cardiovascular risk. Subjects: 303 obese adults (body mass index equal to or greater than 30 kg/m2) with heart failure, treated in an ambulatory clinic or hospital setting of a large Midwest tertiary-care center. Method: Cross-sectional, correlational design using a convenience sample and valid, reliable surveys of diet adherence, functional status and knowledge. Regression models were created for each outcome variable based on body mass index and central adiposity measures. Results: In 303 patients, knowledge scores were low (mean 10.2 +/- 3.2 or 51% correct responses). After adjusting for significant patient characteristics, diet adherence, functional status and knowledge did not differ by body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio or metabolic syndrome status (P values 0.37-0.97); but waist circumference was inversely associated with most diet behaviors (P values 0.01-0.08). Men had higher functional status but were less likely to adhere to a low-sodium/low-fat diet, reduce calories and reduce fat intake. Diabetics requiring medications had lower functional status but were more likely to reduce calories and adhere to diet than non-diabetics. Conclusions: Waist circumference predicted diet adherence; other central adiposity measures did not predict diet and no measures predicted functional status or knowledge. Knowledge about diet, exercise and adiposity distribution was poor; education is a first step to facilitating diet behaviors and activities that improve heart failure morbidity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Central Adiposity Measures Predict Lifestyle Patterns and Knowledge in Obese Patients with Heart Failure?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159870-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Central Adiposity Measures Predict Lifestyle Patterns and Knowledge in Obese Patients with Heart Failure?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research and Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9500 Euclid Avenue, Mailcode J3-4, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-444-7028</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">albertn@ccf.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.M. Albert, J. Forney, E. Slifcak, Nursing Research and Innovation, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; J.F. Bena, A.S. Tang, Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine relationships between central adiposity measures (waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, and metabolic syndrome status) and patient characteristics, lifestyle patterns (diet adherence and functional status) and knowledge of diet, exercise and adiposity distribution to determine if central adiposity measures are better predictors than body mass index of factors that influence cardiovascular morbidity risk. Conceptual Model: In the 'obesity paradox' in heart failure, obesity is a risk factor for developing heart failure; yet once diagnosed, obese heart failure patients have longer survival than non-obese patients. The obesity paradox was based on general obesity using body mass index status. It is unknown if central adiposity measures are better predictors of variables associated with cardiovascular risk. Subjects: 303 obese adults (body mass index equal to or greater than 30 kg/m2) with heart failure, treated in an ambulatory clinic or hospital setting of a large Midwest tertiary-care center. Method: Cross-sectional, correlational design using a convenience sample and valid, reliable surveys of diet adherence, functional status and knowledge. Regression models were created for each outcome variable based on body mass index and central adiposity measures. Results: In 303 patients, knowledge scores were low (mean 10.2 +/- 3.2 or 51% correct responses). After adjusting for significant patient characteristics, diet adherence, functional status and knowledge did not differ by body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio or metabolic syndrome status (P values 0.37-0.97); but waist circumference was inversely associated with most diet behaviors (P values 0.01-0.08). Men had higher functional status but were less likely to adhere to a low-sodium/low-fat diet, reduce calories and reduce fat intake. Diabetics requiring medications had lower functional status but were more likely to reduce calories and adhere to diet than non-diabetics. Conclusions: Waist circumference predicted diet adherence; other central adiposity measures did not predict diet and no measures predicted functional status or knowledge. Knowledge about diet, exercise and adiposity distribution was poor; education is a first step to facilitating diet behaviors and activities that improve heart failure morbidity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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