2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159872
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Vitamin D Status and Preeclampsia
Abstract:
Vitamin D Status and Preeclampsia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Anderson, Cindy, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Family and Community Nursing
Contact Address:400 Oxford Street, Stop 9025, NPCBR, College of Nursing, Rm 340D, Grand Forks, ND, ND, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4354
Co-Authors:C.M. Anderson, C. Iseminger, C. Lauzon, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;
National trends demonstrate an overall increase in the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, particularly among those with reduced sun exposure. Vitamin D insufficiency in pregnancy is associated with increased blood pressure and risk for preeclampsia, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. Little is known about vitamin D status and risk for preeclampsia among rural childbearing women of the Northern Plains. The purpose of this study was to describe vitamin D status in early pregnancy and to determine the relationship of first trimester maternal vitamin D status and preeclampsia among rural women in the northern plains. Using a prospective design and convenience sampling, women were recruited between 10-12 weeks of pregnancy (n=46). Vitamin D dietary intake was based on responses from a food frequency questionnaire. Maternal vitamin D status was measured by quantification of 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 in maternal serum. Pregnancy outcome (normotension, preeclampsia) was determined through medical record review of gestational blood pressure and proteinuria. Analysis for relations between variables (Pearson, Chi Square) and group differences (t-test, ANOVA) were determined (p<0.05). Vitamin D adequacy was limited to 30% of the sample, with the remaining 70% of participants either insufficient (44%) or deficient (26%). All women (n=46) reported supplement use containing the recommended vitamin D intake of 400 IU, with dietary intake providing an additional 337, 259, and 342 IU/day among those with adequate, insufficient and deficient status, respectively . The incidence of preeclampsia was 23.9%, with no relationship with vitamin D status or intake. Blood pressure was significantly lower in all three trimesters among women completing the first trimester in the summer, compared to fall and winter. Conclusion: Seasonal blood pressure variations suggest a role for vitamin D though further study throughout gestation is needed to identify underlying mechanisms. Assuring adequate vitamin D status based on a redefined increased minimal level through supplementation may be a cost-effective, accessible strategy to reduce preeclampsia risk, promoting the current and future health of individuals and society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVitamin D Status and Preeclampsiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159872-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Vitamin D Status and Preeclampsia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Cindy, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family and Community Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 Oxford Street, Stop 9025, NPCBR, College of Nursing, Rm 340D, Grand Forks, ND, ND, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4354</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindyanderson@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.M. Anderson, C. Iseminger, C. Lauzon, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">National trends demonstrate an overall increase in the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, particularly among those with reduced sun exposure. Vitamin D insufficiency in pregnancy is associated with increased blood pressure and risk for preeclampsia, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. Little is known about vitamin D status and risk for preeclampsia among rural childbearing women of the Northern Plains. The purpose of this study was to describe vitamin D status in early pregnancy and to determine the relationship of first trimester maternal vitamin D status and preeclampsia among rural women in the northern plains. Using a prospective design and convenience sampling, women were recruited between 10-12 weeks of pregnancy (n=46). Vitamin D dietary intake was based on responses from a food frequency questionnaire. Maternal vitamin D status was measured by quantification of 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 in maternal serum. Pregnancy outcome (normotension, preeclampsia) was determined through medical record review of gestational blood pressure and proteinuria. Analysis for relations between variables (Pearson, Chi Square) and group differences (t-test, ANOVA) were determined (p&lt;0.05). Vitamin D adequacy was limited to 30% of the sample, with the remaining 70% of participants either insufficient (44%) or deficient (26%). All women (n=46) reported supplement use containing the recommended vitamin D intake of 400 IU, with dietary intake providing an additional 337, 259, and 342 IU/day among those with adequate, insufficient and deficient status, respectively . The incidence of preeclampsia was 23.9%, with no relationship with vitamin D status or intake. Blood pressure was significantly lower in all three trimesters among women completing the first trimester in the summer, compared to fall and winter. Conclusion: Seasonal blood pressure variations suggest a role for vitamin D though further study throughout gestation is needed to identify underlying mechanisms. Assuring adequate vitamin D status based on a redefined increased minimal level through supplementation may be a cost-effective, accessible strategy to reduce preeclampsia risk, promoting the current and future health of individuals and society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.