2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159874
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inpatient Diabetes Management Initiative
Abstract:
Inpatient Diabetes Management Initiative
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Balakas, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Barnes-Jewish College
Contact Address:4483 Duncan Avenue, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Contact Telephone:314-454-8790
Co-Authors:K. Balakas, , Barnes-Jewish College, St. Louis, MO; K. Balakas, S. Kerr, S. Hofmann, , Missouri Baptist Medical Center, St. Louis, MO;
Framework Research indicates that acute hyperglycemia occurs in most critically ill patients and is associated with adverse outcomes. This has resulted in the development of protocols to achieve strict glucose control in these patients. Similar to intensive care patients, medical-surgical patients may also benefit from much improved glucose control. Review of internal data indicated that blood glucose values were consistently obtained at least one hour prior to administration of prandial or correctional insulin. Purpose This pilot study was conducted to determine if a change in practice for administration of correction and/or prandial insulin would result in improved blood glucose levels. Methods Nurses on an orthopedic surgical unit and a medical unit completed a pre-test to ascertain knowledge related to prandial and correctional insulin dosing and diabetes management. This information was used to construct a 2-hour class for RNs on the units. Sixty-seven RNs participated in 10 classes delivered over a 2-week period. Following the educational intervention, the process for obtaining blood glucose values was changed. Each RN was provided with a glucose meter and obtained the patient's blood glucose value just prior to insulin administration. Blood glucose levels, testing times, insulin dose and administration times were collected through the hospital's electronic charting system over a 3-month period. Results & Conclusions After data management, 312 subjects were used in the analysis. For all time periods, the interval between glucose testing and insulin administration was significantly decreased (p<0.001). Nurses consistently administered the correct dose (98.6%) on both units. When using a therapeutic range of 70-140 to indicate adequate glucose control, prompt administration of insulin was associated with overall glucose control (p=0.016). However, data also demonstrated that the current insulin orders may not be adequate to obtain and maintain therapeutic glucose control.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInpatient Diabetes Management Initiativeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159874-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Inpatient Diabetes Management Initiative</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Balakas, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barnes-Jewish College</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4483 Duncan Avenue, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-454-8790</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">KaBalakas@bjc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Balakas, , Barnes-Jewish College, St. Louis, MO; K. Balakas, S. Kerr, S. Hofmann, , Missouri Baptist Medical Center, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Framework Research indicates that acute hyperglycemia occurs in most critically ill patients and is associated with adverse outcomes. This has resulted in the development of protocols to achieve strict glucose control in these patients. Similar to intensive care patients, medical-surgical patients may also benefit from much improved glucose control. Review of internal data indicated that blood glucose values were consistently obtained at least one hour prior to administration of prandial or correctional insulin. Purpose This pilot study was conducted to determine if a change in practice for administration of correction and/or prandial insulin would result in improved blood glucose levels. Methods Nurses on an orthopedic surgical unit and a medical unit completed a pre-test to ascertain knowledge related to prandial and correctional insulin dosing and diabetes management. This information was used to construct a 2-hour class for RNs on the units. Sixty-seven RNs participated in 10 classes delivered over a 2-week period. Following the educational intervention, the process for obtaining blood glucose values was changed. Each RN was provided with a glucose meter and obtained the patient's blood glucose value just prior to insulin administration. Blood glucose levels, testing times, insulin dose and administration times were collected through the hospital's electronic charting system over a 3-month period. Results &amp; Conclusions After data management, 312 subjects were used in the analysis. For all time periods, the interval between glucose testing and insulin administration was significantly decreased (p&lt;0.001). Nurses consistently administered the correct dose (98.6%) on both units. When using a therapeutic range of 70-140 to indicate adequate glucose control, prompt administration of insulin was associated with overall glucose control (p=0.016). However, data also demonstrated that the current insulin orders may not be adequate to obtain and maintain therapeutic glucose control.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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