2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Success Among Infants with Phenylketonuria (PKU)
Abstract:
Breastfeeding Success Among Infants with Phenylketonuria (PKU)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Banta-Wright, Sandra, MN, NNP
P.I. Institution Name:OHSU
Title:SON
Contact Address:7316 SE 13th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97202, USA
Contact Telephone:503.703.1895
Co-Authors:S.A. Banta-Wright, G.M. Houck, School of Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR; N.D. Lowe, College of Nursing, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO; K.A. Knafl, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel H
PKU is due to a defect in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene leading to elevated phenylalanine (Phe). With early identification of newborns with PKU, initiation of a diet low in Phe can result in normal cognitive development, rather than profound mental retardation associated with classic PKU. However, PKU management regarding the inclusion or exclusion of breastfeeding greatly varies from clinic to clinic. This is due to a paucity of research about breastfeeding infants with PKU and few evidence based guidelines for clinical management for breastfeeding infants with PKU and support for their mothers. As a result, there is a lack of interventions to promote successful breastfeeding while adhering to the responsibilities and activities of managing PKU therapy. The purpose of this project was to compare formula-fed and breast-fed infants with PKU in the caseload of a metabolic clinic at a large, regional tertiary care center. The aims of this study were to (1) compare Phe levels between formula-fed and breast-fed infants with PKU and (2) explore the relationships between feeding methods and Phe levels. Criteria were any infant diagnosed with PKU between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 2005 and who received PKU management by 1 month of age. The retrospective study started with 2005 and ended when no further breastfeeding cases within the PKU population were identified. The infant's medical record provided serial Phe levels over time. From 2000 to 2005 during the initial postpartum period, breastfeeding infants with PKU progressively improved to 86%. By 6 months of age, infants with PKU were breastfeeding 77%. At 1 year of age, breastfeeding infants with PKU were continuing to breastfeed 36%. These infants were not only meeting the HP 2010 objectives for breastfeeding, but surpassing them. In addition, 66% of breast-fed infants with PKU (n= 62) had mean Phe levels within the desired treatment range (2-6mg/dl). Continuing analysis will occur to compare Phe control in breast-fed versus formula-fed infants with PKU and to examine variables that maybe important to any observed differences will be completed by March 2010.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding Success Among Infants with Phenylketonuria (PKU)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding Success Among Infants with Phenylketonuria (PKU)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banta-Wright, Sandra, MN, NNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">OHSU</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">SON</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7316 SE 13th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503.703.1895</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bantawrs@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.A. Banta-Wright, G.M. Houck, School of Nursing, Oregon Health &amp; Science University, Portland, OR; N.D. Lowe, College of Nursing, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO; K.A. Knafl, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel H</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PKU is due to a defect in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene leading to elevated phenylalanine (Phe). With early identification of newborns with PKU, initiation of a diet low in Phe can result in normal cognitive development, rather than profound mental retardation associated with classic PKU. However, PKU management regarding the inclusion or exclusion of breastfeeding greatly varies from clinic to clinic. This is due to a paucity of research about breastfeeding infants with PKU and few evidence based guidelines for clinical management for breastfeeding infants with PKU and support for their mothers. As a result, there is a lack of interventions to promote successful breastfeeding while adhering to the responsibilities and activities of managing PKU therapy. The purpose of this project was to compare formula-fed and breast-fed infants with PKU in the caseload of a metabolic clinic at a large, regional tertiary care center. The aims of this study were to (1) compare Phe levels between formula-fed and breast-fed infants with PKU and (2) explore the relationships between feeding methods and Phe levels. Criteria were any infant diagnosed with PKU between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 2005 and who received PKU management by 1 month of age. The retrospective study started with 2005 and ended when no further breastfeeding cases within the PKU population were identified. The infant's medical record provided serial Phe levels over time. From 2000 to 2005 during the initial postpartum period, breastfeeding infants with PKU progressively improved to 86%. By 6 months of age, infants with PKU were breastfeeding 77%. At 1 year of age, breastfeeding infants with PKU were continuing to breastfeed 36%. These infants were not only meeting the HP 2010 objectives for breastfeeding, but surpassing them. In addition, 66% of breast-fed infants with PKU (n= 62) had mean Phe levels within the desired treatment range (2-6mg/dl). Continuing analysis will occur to compare Phe control in breast-fed versus formula-fed infants with PKU and to examine variables that maybe important to any observed differences will be completed by March 2010.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:24:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:24:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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