2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159876
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Status Recovery Following Hospitalization for Heart Failure
Abstract:
Health Status Recovery Following Hospitalization for Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Barnason, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC College of Nursing
Contact Address:P.O. Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Contact Telephone:(402) 472-7359
Co-Authors:S. Barnason, L. Zimmerman, Lincoln Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Lincoln, NE;
Heart failure (HF) is a common cause of hospitalization, however there is limited information regarding patients' recovery of health status following hospital to home transition. The Heart Failure Health Status model (Suwwanno et al., 2009) conceptualizes health status as the consequence of self-management abilities. The study purposes were to examine the health status recovery trajectory of older adults (> 65 years old) at 1- and 3-months following hospitalization for HF and to examine the relationship between self-efficacy (SE) for HF self-management and health status. Subjects (n=20), who were in a control group of a larger study, had been hospitalized for HF and completed the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). The sample included 14 males and 6 females; with a mean age of 78.4 plus 7.6 years. Using Wilcoxin signed rank tests, health status measured by the MLHFQ did not significantly improve over time. The most frequently reported difficulties at all times were: walking or climbing stairs, working around the house or yard, feeling tired or fatigued, and being short of breath. Clinically significant health status changes can be indicated by a > 5 point increase in total MLHFQ score; 45% of the subjects at 1-month and 50% of the subjects at 3-months had > 5 point increase. There was a moderate correlation of SE (KCCQ subscale) and health status (MLHFQ) at 1-month (r = -.47, p<.05); indicating that poor health status was significantly related to lower self-efficacy for HF self-care. Health status did not improve as expected following hospitalization. Findings suggest that strategies to improve self-efficacy, such as interventions for self-management, may increase health status of patients with HF following hospitalization; thereby decreasing their risk for rehospitalization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Status Recovery Following Hospitalization for Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159876-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Status Recovery Following Hospitalization for Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnason, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(402) 472-7359</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sbarnaso@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Barnason, L. Zimmerman, Lincoln Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Lincoln, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Heart failure (HF) is a common cause of hospitalization, however there is limited information regarding patients' recovery of health status following hospital to home transition. The Heart Failure Health Status model (Suwwanno et al., 2009) conceptualizes health status as the consequence of self-management abilities. The study purposes were to examine the health status recovery trajectory of older adults (&gt; 65 years old) at 1- and 3-months following hospitalization for HF and to examine the relationship between self-efficacy (SE) for HF self-management and health status. Subjects (n=20), who were in a control group of a larger study, had been hospitalized for HF and completed the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ). The sample included 14 males and 6 females; with a mean age of 78.4 plus 7.6 years. Using Wilcoxin signed rank tests, health status measured by the MLHFQ did not significantly improve over time. The most frequently reported difficulties at all times were: walking or climbing stairs, working around the house or yard, feeling tired or fatigued, and being short of breath. Clinically significant health status changes can be indicated by a &gt; 5 point increase in total MLHFQ score; 45% of the subjects at 1-month and 50% of the subjects at 3-months had &gt; 5 point increase. There was a moderate correlation of SE (KCCQ subscale) and health status (MLHFQ) at 1-month (r = -.47, p&lt;.05); indicating that poor health status was significantly related to lower self-efficacy for HF self-care. Health status did not improve as expected following hospitalization. Findings suggest that strategies to improve self-efficacy, such as interventions for self-management, may increase health status of patients with HF following hospitalization; thereby decreasing their risk for rehospitalization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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