Beyond birth: The Role of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as Community Leaders

4.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159878
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond birth: The Role of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as Community Leaders
Abstract:
Beyond birth: The Role of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as Community Leaders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Baxter, Jennifer, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:3550 N Lake Shore Drive #204, #204, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA
Contact Telephone:917 4148214
Co-Authors:J.S. Baxter, K.F. Norr, Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; C.P. Kaponda, A. Malata, R. Ngalande, L.C. Kumbani, Kamuzu College of Nursing, University of Malawi, Lilongwe, MALAWI; G.B. Keeney, , Grow
Purpose: TBAs provide needed health care in communities distant from health centers in Malawi, and their involvement in the community includes an important leadership component beyond childbirth issues. The purpose of this research is to describe the community leader role for TBAs from their own perspective. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The World Health Organization's (WHO) primary health care model provides a framework for integrating traditional community leaders into health promotion to increase accessibility and acceptability. Subjects: This secondary analysis used data from a purposive sample of 22 TBAs with various experience levels from four districts of the southern region of Malawi. Method: Translated and transcribed in-depth, open-ended interviews from a descriptive, exploratory study were coded for core themes related to the TBA community leadership role using Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis software. Results: Preliminary results show that many TBAs are highly involved in community activities. TBAs work collaboratively with traditional leaders, have respect from men as well as women, and can be intermediaries between the community and the formal health care system. Conclusions: Although WHO recommends transitioning to skilled birth attendants, TBAs are still important resources for communities. As authoritative community leaders, TBAs can potentially disseminate women's health promotion messages. Community women would benefit from additional training of TBAs and stronger links between TBAs and the formal health care system. Acknowledgments: The data used for this study are from Preparing Traditional Birth Attendants for HIV Prevention in Malawi, [pilot study within: Building AIDS Research Through UIC AITRP in Malawi (5R24AT001573), NIH/NCCAM, C. Kaponda, PI] G. B. Keeney, PI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeyond birth: The Role of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as Community Leadersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159878-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beyond birth: The Role of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as Community Leaders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baxter, Jennifer, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3550 N Lake Shore Drive #204, #204, Chicago, IL, 60657, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">917 4148214</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbaxte2@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.S. Baxter, K.F. Norr, Women, Children, and Family Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; C.P. Kaponda, A. Malata, R. Ngalande, L.C. Kumbani, Kamuzu College of Nursing, University of Malawi, Lilongwe, MALAWI; G.B. Keeney, , Grow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: TBAs provide needed health care in communities distant from health centers in Malawi, and their involvement in the community includes an important leadership component beyond childbirth issues. The purpose of this research is to describe the community leader role for TBAs from their own perspective. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The World Health Organization's (WHO) primary health care model provides a framework for integrating traditional community leaders into health promotion to increase accessibility and acceptability. Subjects: This secondary analysis used data from a purposive sample of 22 TBAs with various experience levels from four districts of the southern region of Malawi. Method: Translated and transcribed in-depth, open-ended interviews from a descriptive, exploratory study were coded for core themes related to the TBA community leadership role using Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis software. Results: Preliminary results show that many TBAs are highly involved in community activities. TBAs work collaboratively with traditional leaders, have respect from men as well as women, and can be intermediaries between the community and the formal health care system. Conclusions: Although WHO recommends transitioning to skilled birth attendants, TBAs are still important resources for communities. As authoritative community leaders, TBAs can potentially disseminate women's health promotion messages. Community women would benefit from additional training of TBAs and stronger links between TBAs and the formal health care system. Acknowledgments: The data used for this study are from Preparing Traditional Birth Attendants for HIV Prevention in Malawi, [pilot study within: Building AIDS Research Through UIC AITRP in Malawi (5R24AT001573), NIH/NCCAM, C. Kaponda, PI] G. B. Keeney, PI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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