2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159880
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary Cortisol Responses in Migrant Farmworkers
Abstract:
Salivary Cortisol Responses in Migrant Farmworkers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Clingerman, Evelyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Contact Telephone:1-512-471-8361
Co-Authors:E. Clingerman, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX;
Purpose: There is little research regarding stress and physiological responses to stress in underserved populations. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore migration stress and a biomarker of stress, salivary cortisol (sC), in two groups of migrant farmworkers. Theoretical Framework and Sample: A biopsychosocial model of stress provided direction for this study. Data were collected from a convenience sample of diabetic (n = 30) and non-diabetic (n=30) migrant farmworkers in the northern Great Lakes region of the United States. Method: This mixed-methods descriptive, exploratory study collected physical measures (blood pressure, height, weight) and sC specimens from migrant farmworkers. Participants also completed a migration stress inventory. Results: The typical diurnal pattern was observed with mean sC level at Time 2 (14.16 nmol/l, 14.01 nmol/l) greater than at Time 1 (9.02 nmol/l, 8.04 nmol/l) for diabetic and non-diabetic participants respectively, and a noticeable decline until bedtime (2.62 nmol/l, 2.47 nmol/l). Diabetic and non-diabetic participants exhibited a significant change in sC over time (F [1.77, 99.51] = 93.23, p = <.001), but lacked a significant time x group interaction (F [1.77, 99.51] = .16, p =.83). Participant scores on the occupational stress subscale differed significantly (t [56] = -2.036, p= .03) for sC responders (> 2.5 nmol/l, T1 to T2) compared to non-responders. Conclusions: Collection of salivary biomarkers from migrant farmworkers is possible. The observed sC pattern of non-responder migrant farmworkers is uncharacteristic of typical sC response patterns and merits further exploration to identify a possible blunting of sC response. Additional demographic and psychosocial factors should be examined to identify individual differences in sC rhythms in migrant farmworkers. Acknowledgements: The Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research on Underserved Populations, Pilot Study, P30NR005051, supported this research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary Cortisol Responses in Migrant Farmworkersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159880-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary Cortisol Responses in Migrant Farmworkers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clingerman, Evelyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">1-512-471-8361</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emclinge@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Clingerman, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is little research regarding stress and physiological responses to stress in underserved populations. The purpose of this study was to describe and explore migration stress and a biomarker of stress, salivary cortisol (sC), in two groups of migrant farmworkers. Theoretical Framework and Sample: A biopsychosocial model of stress provided direction for this study. Data were collected from a convenience sample of diabetic (n = 30) and non-diabetic (n=30) migrant farmworkers in the northern Great Lakes region of the United States. Method: This mixed-methods descriptive, exploratory study collected physical measures (blood pressure, height, weight) and sC specimens from migrant farmworkers. Participants also completed a migration stress inventory. Results: The typical diurnal pattern was observed with mean sC level at Time 2 (14.16 nmol/l, 14.01 nmol/l) greater than at Time 1 (9.02 nmol/l, 8.04 nmol/l) for diabetic and non-diabetic participants respectively, and a noticeable decline until bedtime (2.62 nmol/l, 2.47 nmol/l). Diabetic and non-diabetic participants exhibited a significant change in sC over time (F [1.77, 99.51] = 93.23, p = &lt;.001), but lacked a significant time x group interaction (F [1.77, 99.51] = .16, p =.83). Participant scores on the occupational stress subscale differed significantly (t [56] = -2.036, p= .03) for sC responders (&gt; 2.5 nmol/l, T1 to T2) compared to non-responders. Conclusions: Collection of salivary biomarkers from migrant farmworkers is possible. The observed sC pattern of non-responder migrant farmworkers is uncharacteristic of typical sC response patterns and merits further exploration to identify a possible blunting of sC response. Additional demographic and psychosocial factors should be examined to identify individual differences in sC rhythms in migrant farmworkers. Acknowledgements: The Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research on Underserved Populations, Pilot Study, P30NR005051, supported this research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.