2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159882
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventions
Abstract:
Meta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Conn, Vicki, PhD RN FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Contact Address:S317 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573 882 0231
Co-Authors:V. Conn, , University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Problem: Worksites provide an excellent setting for physical activity (PA) programs because workers spend half their waking hours at workplaces on workdays. Additional potential advantages of workplace interventions include convenience, group support, existing social networks, and corporate norms which may foster PA behavior change. Despite these potential benefits of worksite PA programs, no previous comprehensive meta-analysis has integrated health and PA behavior outcomes from these programs. This comprehensive meta-analysis synthesized the extant worksite PA intervention research. Methods: Intensive and extensive searching located published and unpublished intervention studies. Descriptive, moderator, and effect size data were reliably coded from primary studies. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures, including exploratory moderator analyses, were conducted. Heterogeneity (Q) was measured. Publication bias was assessed by visual and statistical analysis of funnel plots. Effect sizes were converted to original metrics when possible. Results: Standardized mean difference (d) effect sizes were synthesized across 38,231 subjects from 206 comparisons in 138 reports. Significantly positive effects were observed for PA behavior (0.21), diabetes risk (0.98), fitness (0.57), lipids (0.13), anthropometric measures (0.08), work attendance (0.19), and job stress (0.33). The mean effect size for diabetes risk corresponds to a difference between treatment minus control subjects' means on fasting glucose of -12.6 mg/dL; for lipids, -0.2 on total cholesterol:HDL; and for fitness, V02max of 3.5 mL/kg/min. Significant heterogeneity (Q) documented intervention effects varied across studies for each outcome variable. Moderator analyses suggested interventions may be more effective when delivered at the worksite, delivered by workplace employees, and when workplaces participated in designing interventions. Funnel plots suggested publication bias for most outcomes. Conclusions: Some worksite PA interventions can improve both health and important workplace outcomes. Future primary research should compare interventions to confirm causal relationships and further explore heterogeneity as a foundation for nursing interventions to increase PA and improve health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159882-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Conn, Vicki, PhD RN FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S317 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 882 0231</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">conn@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V. Conn, , University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Worksites provide an excellent setting for physical activity (PA) programs because workers spend half their waking hours at workplaces on workdays. Additional potential advantages of workplace interventions include convenience, group support, existing social networks, and corporate norms which may foster PA behavior change. Despite these potential benefits of worksite PA programs, no previous comprehensive meta-analysis has integrated health and PA behavior outcomes from these programs. This comprehensive meta-analysis synthesized the extant worksite PA intervention research. Methods: Intensive and extensive searching located published and unpublished intervention studies. Descriptive, moderator, and effect size data were reliably coded from primary studies. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures, including exploratory moderator analyses, were conducted. Heterogeneity (Q) was measured. Publication bias was assessed by visual and statistical analysis of funnel plots. Effect sizes were converted to original metrics when possible. Results: Standardized mean difference (d) effect sizes were synthesized across 38,231 subjects from 206 comparisons in 138 reports. Significantly positive effects were observed for PA behavior (0.21), diabetes risk (0.98), fitness (0.57), lipids (0.13), anthropometric measures (0.08), work attendance (0.19), and job stress (0.33). The mean effect size for diabetes risk corresponds to a difference between treatment minus control subjects' means on fasting glucose of -12.6 mg/dL; for lipids, -0.2 on total cholesterol:HDL; and for fitness, V02max of 3.5 mL/kg/min. Significant heterogeneity (Q) documented intervention effects varied across studies for each outcome variable. Moderator analyses suggested interventions may be more effective when delivered at the worksite, delivered by workplace employees, and when workplaces participated in designing interventions. Funnel plots suggested publication bias for most outcomes. Conclusions: Some worksite PA interventions can improve both health and important workplace outcomes. Future primary research should compare interventions to confirm causal relationships and further explore heterogeneity as a foundation for nursing interventions to increase PA and improve health outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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