Identities and Risk Behaviors in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159883
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identities and Risk Behaviors in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults
Abstract:
Identities and Risk Behaviors in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Corte, Colleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-7025
Co-Authors:C. Corte, A. Matthews, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Kuhns, , Howard Brown Health Center, Chicago, IL;
Health risk behaviors are disproportionately high in sexual minority adolescents. Although research has clearly demonstrated that properties of social and personal self-identities predict risk behavior in heterosexual adolescents and young adults, to date, no research has examined such relationships in lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) adolescents and young adults nor has it considered LGBT-specific self-identities such as sexual orientation identity and gender identity in relationship to risk behavior. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to examine relationships between self-identities and risk behaviors in an ethnically-diverse community-recruited sample of sexual minority adolescents and young adults using a social-cognitive model of identity development. We are using qualitative methods to obtain information about the total collection of spontaneously generated personal and social self-identities. We are using Computer Assisted Structured Interview (CASI) methodology to measure 1) characteristics of two LGBT-specific self-identities including sexual orientation identity and gender identity, 2) health risk behaviors including substance use (alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs), substance problems, and sexual risk taking, and 3) known LGBT-specific precursors for health risk behaviors including depressive symptoms and sexual minority stress. Data collection is currently in process. We will determine whether relationships between few positive and many negative self-identities and an alcohol-specific self-identity (i.e., "drinking is an important part of who I am") and health risk behaviors found in heterosexual adolescents can be replicated in LGBT adolescents and young adults. Then we will determine whether characteristics of LGBT-specific self-identities (sexual orientation identity, gender identity, and certainty and importance of these identities) have additional explanatory power in predicting health risk behaviors. The findings will contribute to the theoretically-guided understanding of elevated risk among LGBT adolescents, facilitate identification of sexual minority adolescents who may be most vulnerable for engaging in risk behavior, and inform the development of interventions to prevent health risk behaviors in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentities and Risk Behaviors in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159883-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identities and Risk Behaviors in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corte, Colleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-7025</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccorte@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Corte, A. Matthews, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Kuhns, , Howard Brown Health Center, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health risk behaviors are disproportionately high in sexual minority adolescents. Although research has clearly demonstrated that properties of social and personal self-identities predict risk behavior in heterosexual adolescents and young adults, to date, no research has examined such relationships in lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) adolescents and young adults nor has it considered LGBT-specific self-identities such as sexual orientation identity and gender identity in relationship to risk behavior. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to examine relationships between self-identities and risk behaviors in an ethnically-diverse community-recruited sample of sexual minority adolescents and young adults using a social-cognitive model of identity development. We are using qualitative methods to obtain information about the total collection of spontaneously generated personal and social self-identities. We are using Computer Assisted Structured Interview (CASI) methodology to measure 1) characteristics of two LGBT-specific self-identities including sexual orientation identity and gender identity, 2) health risk behaviors including substance use (alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs), substance problems, and sexual risk taking, and 3) known LGBT-specific precursors for health risk behaviors including depressive symptoms and sexual minority stress. Data collection is currently in process. We will determine whether relationships between few positive and many negative self-identities and an alcohol-specific self-identity (i.e., &quot;drinking is an important part of who I am&quot;) and health risk behaviors found in heterosexual adolescents can be replicated in LGBT adolescents and young adults. Then we will determine whether characteristics of LGBT-specific self-identities (sexual orientation identity, gender identity, and certainty and importance of these identities) have additional explanatory power in predicting health risk behaviors. The findings will contribute to the theoretically-guided understanding of elevated risk among LGBT adolescents, facilitate identification of sexual minority adolescents who may be most vulnerable for engaging in risk behavior, and inform the development of interventions to prevent health risk behaviors in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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