2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159885
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Makes an Interprofessional Healthcare Team Successful?
Abstract:
What Makes an Interprofessional Healthcare Team Successful?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Cuvar, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University School of Nursing
Contact Address:3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8925
Co-Authors:K.M. Cuvar, Nursing, Saint Louis University School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO; J. Smith, Health Infomatics and Information Management, Saint Louis University School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO;
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the traits, qualities, and attributes deemed as successful and unsuccessful in healthcare teams in order to incorporate knowledge gained in the implementation of an interprofessional education program. Theoretical Framework: A phenomenological approach was utilized to study the meaning of the "lived experience" of being involved in an interprofessional healthcare team. The desire was to "describe the meaning" of the experience. Subjects: Fourteen subjects were recruited from three metropolitan sites with established interprofessional teams in place. These sites included: a medical center acute care unit, a hospice, and outpatient clinical practice. Method: Data was collected by the primary investigator using a semi-structured interview technique over a four-month period. Interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim by a professional transcriptionist. Significant statements were identified. Meanings were extracted and clustered into themes. Themes were then compared across members of the healthcare team. Results: Three major themes emerged: open communication, mutual respect, and teamwork. Open communication is viewed as exchanging communication in an open and honest manner that is meaningful to all parties. Mutual respect is consideration and thoughtfulness among team members. Teamwork is defined as working together in a cooperative effort to meet the patient's needs. Conclusions: The more informed the team becomes the better care they can provide to patients. To be successful, communication must be open and honest and each member must have consideration and thoughtfulness for each other. Members learn to leave their "egos at the door" in an effort to work together to meet patient needs in an integrated manner.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Makes an Interprofessional Healthcare Team Successful?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159885-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What Makes an Interprofessional Healthcare Team Successful?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cuvar, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8925</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cuvark@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.M. Cuvar, Nursing, Saint Louis University School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO; J. Smith, Health Infomatics and Information Management, Saint Louis University School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the traits, qualities, and attributes deemed as successful and unsuccessful in healthcare teams in order to incorporate knowledge gained in the implementation of an interprofessional education program. Theoretical Framework: A phenomenological approach was utilized to study the meaning of the &quot;lived experience&quot; of being involved in an interprofessional healthcare team. The desire was to &quot;describe the meaning&quot; of the experience. Subjects: Fourteen subjects were recruited from three metropolitan sites with established interprofessional teams in place. These sites included: a medical center acute care unit, a hospice, and outpatient clinical practice. Method: Data was collected by the primary investigator using a semi-structured interview technique over a four-month period. Interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim by a professional transcriptionist. Significant statements were identified. Meanings were extracted and clustered into themes. Themes were then compared across members of the healthcare team. Results: Three major themes emerged: open communication, mutual respect, and teamwork. Open communication is viewed as exchanging communication in an open and honest manner that is meaningful to all parties. Mutual respect is consideration and thoughtfulness among team members. Teamwork is defined as working together in a cooperative effort to meet the patient's needs. Conclusions: The more informed the team becomes the better care they can provide to patients. To be successful, communication must be open and honest and each member must have consideration and thoughtfulness for each other. Members learn to leave their &quot;egos at the door&quot; in an effort to work together to meet patient needs in an integrated manner.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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