2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159886
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Genetic Literacy of Nursing Students
Abstract:
Measuring Genetic Literacy of Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Daack-Hirsch, Sandra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:50 Newton Rd, 372 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7061
Co-Authors:S. Daack-Hirsch, M. Driessnack, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Background: Advances in genetics are not only changing the way the public thinks about the world around them but they are also changing the way health care providers, including nurses, understand and approach health promotion, disease prevention, disease causation and risk, and treatment responses. The understanding of genetic and genomic concepts has even surfaced in the new Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Professional Nursing Practice. Yet, little is known about a nurse's genetic literacy level or what tools are available to identify, assess, and track advances in student understanding that are relevant to nursing practice. Purpose: To explore the availability, focus, and applicability of existing genetic literacy assessment guidelines and tools. Method: A systematic review of the literature was conducted focusing on genetic literacy assessment guidelines and tools relevant to nursing. Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycInfo were searched from 2000 to January 2009. Findings: Three programmatic resources for the evaluation of integration of genetic concepts in nursing curriculum, students, and faculty were identified as having relevancy to nursing curricula development and assessment of students: 1) the Genetics Literacy Assessment Instrument for Undergraduates (GLIA) developed by Bowling and colleagues (2008), 2) the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines for Genetics and Genomics developed by the Consensus Panel on Genetic/Genomic Nursing Competencies (2006), and 3) the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Genetics (REAL-G) (2007). Each is summarized and critiqued. Discussion: As professional education standards in nursing require the integration of genetic concepts in nursing curriculum, the availability of programmatic resources for curriculum development and outcome evaluation are needed. Three programmatic resources are shared. While the competency and curricula guideline was specifically developed for nurses, the two genetic literacy tools were not. Their specific applicability for nurses needs further evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Genetic Literacy of Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159886-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Genetic Literacy of Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Daack-Hirsch, Sandra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">50 Newton Rd, 372 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7061</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sandra-daack-hirsch@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Daack-Hirsch, M. Driessnack, College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Advances in genetics are not only changing the way the public thinks about the world around them but they are also changing the way health care providers, including nurses, understand and approach health promotion, disease prevention, disease causation and risk, and treatment responses. The understanding of genetic and genomic concepts has even surfaced in the new Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Professional Nursing Practice. Yet, little is known about a nurse's genetic literacy level or what tools are available to identify, assess, and track advances in student understanding that are relevant to nursing practice. Purpose: To explore the availability, focus, and applicability of existing genetic literacy assessment guidelines and tools. Method: A systematic review of the literature was conducted focusing on genetic literacy assessment guidelines and tools relevant to nursing. Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycInfo were searched from 2000 to January 2009. Findings: Three programmatic resources for the evaluation of integration of genetic concepts in nursing curriculum, students, and faculty were identified as having relevancy to nursing curricula development and assessment of students: 1) the Genetics Literacy Assessment Instrument for Undergraduates (GLIA) developed by Bowling and colleagues (2008), 2) the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines for Genetics and Genomics developed by the Consensus Panel on Genetic/Genomic Nursing Competencies (2006), and 3) the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Genetics (REAL-G) (2007). Each is summarized and critiqued. Discussion: As professional education standards in nursing require the integration of genetic concepts in nursing curriculum, the availability of programmatic resources for curriculum development and outcome evaluation are needed. Three programmatic resources are shared. While the competency and curricula guideline was specifically developed for nurses, the two genetic literacy tools were not. Their specific applicability for nurses needs further evaluation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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