Associations of Maternal Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants with Asthma in Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159892
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Associations of Maternal Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants with Asthma in Children
Abstract:
Associations of Maternal Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants with Asthma in Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Eldeirawi, Kamal, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:College of Nursing-Health Systems Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3124139792
Co-Authors:K. Eldeirawi, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Introduction: Studies linking maternal serum concentrations of carotenoids with asthma in children are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of life-time doctor-diagnosed asthma in children with maternal serum levels of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin in a population-based and representative sample of the United States' children. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed data on 2290 pairs of mothers and their children aged 2 months-6 years who were examined in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted treating serum concentrations of the antioxidants as categorical variables (quintiles). IRB approval was deemed unnecessary because the study was based on publicly available data. Results: Mothers of children with asthma had significantly lower serum concentrations of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin than mothers of children without asthma with significant does-dependent inverse associations between serum levels of these nutrients and the odds of asthma. The odds ratios (ORs) comparing children of mothers whose serum concentrations were in the 5th quintile with children whose mothers' serum concentrations were in the 1st quintile were 2.53 (95% CI: 1.06-6.03), 3.48 (95% CI: 1.32-9.17), and 2.60 (95% CI: 1.24-5.47), for alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin, respectively, with significant tests for trends obtained for the three nutrient markers. These associations persisted after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and educational level of the family reference person. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated inverse associations of maternal serum levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin with the odds of asthma in children. These findings add to the growing body of literature linking asthma in children with maternal dietary factors and highlight the need for longitudinal studies to further examine the relationships of maternal diet during pregnancy or early in the child's life with the risk of asthma in children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssociations of Maternal Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants with Asthma in Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159892-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Associations of Maternal Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants with Asthma in Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eldeirawi, Kamal, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing-Health Systems Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3124139792</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">keldei1@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Eldeirawi, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Studies linking maternal serum concentrations of carotenoids with asthma in children are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships of life-time doctor-diagnosed asthma in children with maternal serum levels of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin in a population-based and representative sample of the United States' children. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed data on 2290 pairs of mothers and their children aged 2 months-6 years who were examined in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted treating serum concentrations of the antioxidants as categorical variables (quintiles). IRB approval was deemed unnecessary because the study was based on publicly available data. Results: Mothers of children with asthma had significantly lower serum concentrations of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin than mothers of children without asthma with significant does-dependent inverse associations between serum levels of these nutrients and the odds of asthma. The odds ratios (ORs) comparing children of mothers whose serum concentrations were in the 5th quintile with children whose mothers' serum concentrations were in the 1st quintile were 2.53 (95% CI: 1.06-6.03), 3.48 (95% CI: 1.32-9.17), and 2.60 (95% CI: 1.24-5.47), for alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin, respectively, with significant tests for trends obtained for the three nutrient markers. These associations persisted after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and educational level of the family reference person. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated inverse associations of maternal serum levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin with the odds of asthma in children. These findings add to the growing body of literature linking asthma in children with maternal dietary factors and highlight the need for longitudinal studies to further examine the relationships of maternal diet during pregnancy or early in the child's life with the risk of asthma in children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:25:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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