2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bipolar Disorder, Depression Symptoms and Tobacco Use in Pregnancy
Abstract:
Bipolar Disorder, Depression Symptoms and Tobacco Use in Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Flick, Louise, DrPH
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Family & Community Health
Contact Address:Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:314-249-1042
Co-Authors:L.H. Flick, Family and Community Health, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL; C.L. Cook, Director of Research, Univeristy of Cincinnatti, Cincinnati, OH; S. Homan, , Kansas Health Institute, Lawrence , KS;
Prenatal screening for depression symptoms is common and prenatal depression has been linked to persistent tobacco use. However, depression symptoms may occur in bipolar disorder and bipolar disorder and tobacco use are strongly linked. This atheoretical study explores the degree to which depression symptoms in pregnancy are due to bipolar I disorder rather than Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and describes associations between bipolar disorder and prenatal patterns of tobacco use. Subjects in this prospective cohort study include 737 pregnant women recruited through the Women Infant's and Children Supplemental Nutrition Program (WIC) and assessed during pregnancy for psychiatric disorders with the DIS-IV. Tobacco use data, drawn from WIC records (prenatal & postpartum), a pregnancy interview and Missouri birth certificate data describe tobacco use persistence and changes in quantity at several points in pregnancy. Analyses consist of Chi square and t-tests. Fifty-two women (7.0%) had a lifetime diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 39 (5.2%) met criteria for a current bipolar disorder (within 12 months of interview). Results indicate that 51.9 % of women with lifetime bipolar disorder smoked even after pregnancy confirmation regardless of whether they had current symptoms. Of women with a depressive episode during pregnancy, 16.3% were attributable to bipolar disorder rather than to MDD. Women smokers with bipolar disorder were more likely to persist in use after pregnancy confirmation, less likely to try to cut down and reported higher tobacco use than did smokers with MDD. Implications: To focus only on depressive symptoms in prenatal tobacco cessation programs and disregard lifetime or current bipolar disorder may overestimate depression, miss those with bipolar disorder and no current depressive symptoms and lead to inappropriately targeted interventions. These data suggest those with a history of bipolar disorder represent a group with particular vulnerability to the harmful effects of prenatal tobacco use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBipolar Disorder, Depression Symptoms and Tobacco Use in Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159896-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bipolar Disorder, Depression Symptoms and Tobacco Use in Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flick, Louise, DrPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family &amp; Community Health</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-249-1042</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lflick@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.H. Flick, Family and Community Health, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL; C.L. Cook, Director of Research, Univeristy of Cincinnatti, Cincinnati, OH; S. Homan, , Kansas Health Institute, Lawrence , KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Prenatal screening for depression symptoms is common and prenatal depression has been linked to persistent tobacco use. However, depression symptoms may occur in bipolar disorder and bipolar disorder and tobacco use are strongly linked. This atheoretical study explores the degree to which depression symptoms in pregnancy are due to bipolar I disorder rather than Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and describes associations between bipolar disorder and prenatal patterns of tobacco use. Subjects in this prospective cohort study include 737 pregnant women recruited through the Women Infant's and Children Supplemental Nutrition Program (WIC) and assessed during pregnancy for psychiatric disorders with the DIS-IV. Tobacco use data, drawn from WIC records (prenatal &amp; postpartum), a pregnancy interview and Missouri birth certificate data describe tobacco use persistence and changes in quantity at several points in pregnancy. Analyses consist of Chi square and t-tests. Fifty-two women (7.0%) had a lifetime diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 39 (5.2%) met criteria for a current bipolar disorder (within 12 months of interview). Results indicate that 51.9 % of women with lifetime bipolar disorder smoked even after pregnancy confirmation regardless of whether they had current symptoms. Of women with a depressive episode during pregnancy, 16.3% were attributable to bipolar disorder rather than to MDD. Women smokers with bipolar disorder were more likely to persist in use after pregnancy confirmation, less likely to try to cut down and reported higher tobacco use than did smokers with MDD. Implications: To focus only on depressive symptoms in prenatal tobacco cessation programs and disregard lifetime or current bipolar disorder may overestimate depression, miss those with bipolar disorder and no current depressive symptoms and lead to inappropriately targeted interventions. These data suggest those with a history of bipolar disorder represent a group with particular vulnerability to the harmful effects of prenatal tobacco use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.