The Relationship Between Patient Call-Light Usage, Nurse Call-Light Response Time and The Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159899
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between Patient Call-Light Usage, Nurse Call-Light Response Time and The Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers
Abstract:
The Relationship Between Patient Call-Light Usage, Nurse Call-Light Response Time and The Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Grandy, Glenda, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:2951 Boone Ave SW, Wyoming, MI, 49519, USA
Contact Telephone:616-301-1151
Co-Authors:G.A. Grandy, H. Tzeng, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Purpose: This study explored the relationship between patient- and family-initiated call-light usage, nurse responsiveness to call-lights and the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Framework: Florence Nightingales' conceptual model of nursing interventions on the patients environment. The nurse interacts with the patient's environment by assessing for indications of pressure ulcer development. Subjects: One adult acute surgical unit and three adult medical-surgical combined units in a U.S. medical center. Methods: An exploratory design. The archived data by month and unit was retrieved from the study hospital's call-light tracking database and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) reports from January 2004 to March 2008 (n=212 data points). Results: Pearson correlation analyses revealed that when utilizing all data points, no correlation was noted for the relationship between the hospital acquired pressure ulcer rates and the call-light use rate (p=.26). When analyzing data by unit subspecialty, on the surgical unit, as the call-light use rate increased, the nursing staff's call-light response time was faster (r=-.38, p=.005). On the trauma/orthopedics unit, the faster the nursing staff's response time, the more patients with hospital acquired pressure ulcers (r = -.43, p=.003). Spearman's rho analyses found that when utilizing all available data points, as the call-light use rate increased, the unit acquired pressure ulcer rate decreased (r=-.30, p=.04) and when nursing staff's call-light response was slower, there were increased patients with unit acquired pressure ulcers (r=.34, p=.02). Conclusion: Patients should be encouraged to utilize call-light to address any needs and reduce their risk for ulcer development. Implications: Strategies to address education on pressure ulcer prevention for patients and families may reduce risk for ulcer development. Providing education on pressure ulcer prevention to patients and families during pre-procedure planning empowers them to become advocates for their health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Patient Call-Light Usage, Nurse Call-Light Response Time and The Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159899-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Between Patient Call-Light Usage, Nurse Call-Light Response Time and The Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grandy, Glenda, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2951 Boone Ave SW, Wyoming, MI, 49519, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">616-301-1151</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">glenda.grandy@spectrum-health.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">G.A. Grandy, H. Tzeng, , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study explored the relationship between patient- and family-initiated call-light usage, nurse responsiveness to call-lights and the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers. Framework: Florence Nightingales' conceptual model of nursing interventions on the patients environment. The nurse interacts with the patient's environment by assessing for indications of pressure ulcer development. Subjects: One adult acute surgical unit and three adult medical-surgical combined units in a U.S. medical center. Methods: An exploratory design. The archived data by month and unit was retrieved from the study hospital's call-light tracking database and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) reports from January 2004 to March 2008 (n=212 data points). Results: Pearson correlation analyses revealed that when utilizing all data points, no correlation was noted for the relationship between the hospital acquired pressure ulcer rates and the call-light use rate (p=.26). When analyzing data by unit subspecialty, on the surgical unit, as the call-light use rate increased, the nursing staff's call-light response time was faster (r=-.38, p=.005). On the trauma/orthopedics unit, the faster the nursing staff's response time, the more patients with hospital acquired pressure ulcers (r = -.43, p=.003). Spearman's rho analyses found that when utilizing all available data points, as the call-light use rate increased, the unit acquired pressure ulcer rate decreased (r=-.30, p=.04) and when nursing staff's call-light response was slower, there were increased patients with unit acquired pressure ulcers (r=.34, p=.02). Conclusion: Patients should be encouraged to utilize call-light to address any needs and reduce their risk for ulcer development. Implications: Strategies to address education on pressure ulcer prevention for patients and families may reduce risk for ulcer development. Providing education on pressure ulcer prevention to patients and families during pre-procedure planning empowers them to become advocates for their health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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